2009

Chemically Assisted Photocatalytic Oxidation System

The chemically assisted photocatalytic oxidation system (CAPOS) has been proposed for destroying micro-organisms and organic chemicals that may be suspended in the air or present on surfaces of an air-handling system that ventilates an indoor environment. The CAPOS would comprise an upstream and a downstream stage that would implement a tandem combination of two partly redundant treatments. In the upstream stage, the air stream and, optionally, surfaces of the air-handling system would be treated with ozone, which would be generated from oxygen in the air by means of an electrical discharge or ultraviolet light. In the second stage, the air laden with ozone and oxidation products from the first stage would be made to flow in contact with a silica-titania photocatalyst exposed to ultraviolet light in the presence of water vapor. Hydroxyl radicals generated by the photocatalytic action would react with both carbon-containing chemicals and microorganisms to eventually produce water and carbon dioxide, and ozone from the first stage would be photocatalytically degraded to O2. The net products of the two-stage treatment would be H2O, CO2, and O2.

This work was done by Jean Andino, Chang-Yu Wu, David Mazyck, and Arthur A. Teixeira of the University of Florida for Johnson Space Center.

In accordance with Public Law 96-517, the contractor has elected to retain title to this invention. Inquiries concerning rights for its commercial use should be addressed to:

University of Florida
Environmental Engineering
Weil Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611

Refer to MSC-23828-1, volume and number of this NASA Tech Briefs issue, and the page number.