2010

A Capillary-Based Static Phase Separator for Highly Variable Wetting Conditions

Commercially viable two-phase flow/ liquid management field applications have been developed for microgravity.

The invention, a static phase separator (SPS), uses airflow and capillary wetting characteristics to passively separate a two-phase (liquid and air) flow. The device accommodates highly variable liquid wetting characteristics. The resultant design allows for a range of wetting properties from about 0 to over 90° advancing contact angle, with frequent complete separation of liquid from gas observed when using appropriately scaled test conditions. Additionally, the design accommodates a range of air-to-liquid flow-rate ratios from only liquid flow to over 200:1 air-to-liquid flow rate.

Static Phase Separator illustrates the geometry." class="caption" align="left">The SPS uses a helix input section with an ice-cream-cone-shaped constant area cross section (see figure). The wedge portion of the cross section is on the outer edge of the helix, and collects the liquid via centripetal acceleration. The helix then passes into an increasing cross-sectional area vane region. The liquid in the helix wedge is directed into the top of capillary wedges in the liquid containment section. The transition from diffuser to containment section includes a 90° change in capillary pumping direction, while maintaining inertial direction. This serves to impinge the liquid into the two off-center symmetrical vanes by the airflow.

Rather than the airflow serving to shear liquid away from the capillary vanes, the design allows for further penetration of the liquid into the vanes by the air shear. This is also assisted by locating the air exit ports downstream of the liquid drain port. Additionally, any droplets not contained in the capillary vanes are re-entrained downstream by a third opposing capillary vane, which directs liquid back toward the liquid drain port. Finally, the dual air exit ports serve to slow the airflow down, and to reduce the likelihood of shear. The ports are stove-piped into the cavity to form an unfriendly capillary surface for a wetting fluid to carryover. The liquid drain port is located at the start of the containment region, allowing for draining the bulk fluid in a continuous circuit.

The functional operation of the SPS involves introducing liquid flow (from a human body, a syringe, or other source) to the two-phase inlet while an air fan pulls on the air exit lines. The fan is operated until the liquid is fully introduced. The system is drained by negative pressure on the liquid drain lines when the SPS containment system is full.

This work was done by Evan A. Thomas and John C. Graf of Johnson Space Center and Mark M. Weislogel, independent consultant. For more information, download the Technical Support Package (free white paper) at www.techbriefs.com/tsp under the Mechanics/Machinery category.

This invention is owned by NASA, and a patent application has been filed. Inquiries concerning nonexclusive or exclusive license for its commercial development should be addressed to the Patent Counsel, Johnson Space Center, (281) 483-1003. Refer to MSC-24441-1.

This Brief includes a Technical Support Package (TSP).

A Capillary-Based Static Phase Separator for Highly Variable Wetting Conditions (reference MSC-24441-1) is currently available for download from the TSP library.

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