2011

SENSORS Tech Forum: A “Smart” Sensors Technology Event

Over the past ten years, the worldwide sensors technology market has experienced tremendous growth. Today’s sensor technology has been woven seamlessly into our everyday lives through a vast array of new and exciting applications that continue to evolve at a pace never seen before. To put things into perspective, ten years ago the average automobile utilized about 35 sensors. Today, the average automobile incorporates more than 100 sensors that measure and monitor everything from speed, oxygen, and brakes, to parking assistance and airbags.

Here we provide a preview of the conference sessions, special events, and keynote presentations that you can be a part of at SENSORS Tech Forum. And get a sneak peek at the products on display by exhibitors in the SENSORS Tech Forum Exhibitor Showcase on pages 94 and 96 in this issue. Find a full exhibitor list at www.sensorstechforum.com/exhibitors.html.

To register, and for more information, visit www.sensorstechforum.com.

Opening Day Keynote LuncheonOpening Night Networking ReceptionPre-Conference TutorialsConference HighlightsAerospace, Defense & Harsh Environment SensingOptics & ImagingSmart SensorsWireless Technology/Sensor Networking & IntegrationClosing Day Keynote Luncheon

Wednesday, October 12, 12 – 1:30 pm

Microsystem Sensors: Forces Pushing Technology Into the Future

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Dr. Keith Ortiz, Manager,MEMS Technology Department,Sandia National Laboratories

Microsystems technologies, including Micro - ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS), photonics, and other technologies, are revolutionizing sensors, sensor systems, and sensor applications. Many of these advancements are due to the innovative application of brand new technologies for new markets, i.e., technology push, rather than the incremental improvement of existing technologies to satisfy known customer needs, i.e., application pull. Forces that have pushed microsystems technology into applications include making things smaller, lower cost, working at the micro-scale, creating arrays, and integrating. This presentation will discuss these forces, describe example microsystem sensors, and speculate on where these forces will push us in the future.

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