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Lightweight Internal Device to Measure Tension in Hollow- Braided Cordage
System, Apparatus, and Method for Pedal Control
Dust Tolerant Connectors
Foldable and Deployable Power Collection System
Iodine-Compatible Hall Effect Thruster
Development of a Novel Electrospinning System with Automated Positioning and Control Software
2016 Create The Future Design Contest Open For Entries
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New Technology “Prints” Customized Pills

The drug tablet consists of three components: a casing, a non-drug-containing polymer, and a polymer containing the drug in a specially designed shape (shown in photo) that determines the rate of release of the drug. (Photo: National University of Singapore) Researchers have found a way to make personalized medicine cheaper and easier through a tablet fabrication system that 3D prints a myriad of pills in just one tablet. While there are existing tablet-production methods, they can only fabricate tablets that release drugs with a limited type of profiles. The new fabrication method can be applied at individualized settings where physicians could produce customized pills on the spot for patients, or in mass production settings by pharmaceutical companies.

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Low Friction Plastic Technology For Single-use Drug Delivery Devices

Start-up coefficient of friction and stick-slip (or “stiction”) elimination are dominant performance drivers in single-use drug delivery devices that have moving parts. RTP Company has completed a rigorous investigation that establishes and defines a new friction test to measure and compare plastic-against-plastic friction behavior that occurs at initial startup. This new test uses forces and speeds that characterize the action of injection pens, auto-injectors, stop cocks, inhalers, safety syringes and other devices. This paper describes the newly created friction test method, and its core data point known as Glide FactorSM, as well a series of tests to compare the friction behavior of select polymers and internal lubricants for use in single-use drug delivery devices. The use of internally lubricated plastics can eliminate costly secondary operations to apply a topical lubricant, reduce the total amount of silicone that reaches the patient via the device, and improve the overall quality of the device. The goal of this paper is to share a tribological database that enables device designers to screen plastic-on-plastic friction pairs to optimize safe and effective material selections.

Posted in: MDB, White Papers, White Papers, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials, Medical

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Researchers Keep Hydrogels Hydrated

Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed a way to prevent hydrogels from dehydrating. The water-based technique could lead to longer-lasting contact lenses, stretchy microfluidic devices, flexible bioelectronics, and even artificial skin.

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New Method Combats Virtual Reality Sickness

Views of the virtual environment before and after subtle, dynamic FOV modification. (Photo: Ajoy Fernandes and Steve Feiner) Researchers have developed a method of combating virtual reality (VR) sickness that can be applied to consumer head-worn VR displays such as the Sony PlayStation VR. The approach dynamically, yet subtly, changes the user’s field of view (FOV) in response to visually perceived motion.

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Soft Actuator Provides Gentle Strength for Robots

Compliant electrodes are attached to each side of the membrane and cause it to stretch when voltage is applied. A membrane switches from its more compact state to its stretched state when voltage is applied to its electrodes. (©Alejandro Posada) Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart developed a motion system that is compliant and can be integrated in robots thanks to its space-saving design. The device consists of a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), which is a membrane made of hyperelastic material like a latex balloon with flexible electrodes attached to each side. The stretching of the membrane is regulated by means of an electric field between the electrodes.

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Technique Controls Autonomous Vehicles in Extreme Conditions

Georgia Tech researchers are using an electric-powered autonomous vehicle to help driverless vehicles maintain control at the edge of their handling limits. (Photo: Rob Felt) Researchers have devised a novel way to help keep a driverless vehicle under control as it maneuvers at the edge of its handling limits. The new technology is being tested by racing, sliding, and jumping one-fifth-scale, fully autonomous auto-rally cars at the equivalent of 90 mph. The technique – model predictive path integral control (MPPI) – was developed to address the nonlinear dynamics involved in controlling a vehicle near its friction limits.

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Technical Webinar Series from the Editors of SAE: Intelligent Machine Control

In conjunction with SAE As it continues to get harder and harder to find skilled off-highway equipment operators, and equipment is tasked to do more and more, engineers have stepped up to the challenge by designing system solutions that not only think for themselves but also enable streamlined operation that contributes to 24/7 productivity.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars

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