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Can Robots Be Emotional Companions?

Pepper, a new android from the Paris-based SoftBank Group, was unveiled last week in Tokyo. The 4-foot-tall robot has 20 movement-powering motors, a 10.1-inch touch display, and a synchronized, cloud-based database. Pepper also comes equipped with voice-recognition, as well functions that recognize human feelings and emotions. "I've believed that the most important role of robots will be as kind and emotional companions to enhance our daily lives, to bring happiness, constantly surprise us, and make people grow,” Bruno Maisonnier, founder and CEO of Aldebaran, said in a news release. “The emotional robot will create a new dimension in our lives and new ways of interacting with technology.”

Posted in: Question of the Week

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Getting the Most Out Of Your Next Generation Digital Security Surveillance System

As current DSS (digital security surveillance) systems more and more demand real-time analytics, operations benefit greatly from clearer and more information-rich video and maximized computing power.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, White Papers

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High Reliability Flexible Circuits for the Medical Marketplace

Tech-Etch manufacturers high reliability flex circuits used in the diagnostic imaging, patient monitoring, cardiac management and life science industries. Flexible circuits provide the thinnest and lightest interconnect method available. Their extreme thinness makes them very well suited for dynamic applications where the flex will be in constant or periodic motion. They contribute to reducing overall system complexity by facilitating assembly and eliminating wiring errors. Flexible circuits will conform to the available geometry for connections of electronics located on different planes within the finished electronic device. This capability is sometimes referred to as 3D packaging.

Posted in: Medical, White Papers, MDB

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Selecting Miniature Motors for your Medical Devices

The creation of small, portable infusion pumps opened a new chapter in medical care. A patient can receive carefully metered and timed doses of medicine, without requiring a visit to the medical practitioner, allowing life to be less restrictive. Ambulatory pumps have been developed to deliver insulin, nutritive supplements and anticancer drugs.

Posted in: Motion Control, Medical, White Papers, MDB

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Roof Tiles Clean the Air

A team of University of California, Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering students has developed a titanium dioxide roof tile coating that removes up to 97 percent of smog-causing nitrogen oxides.The students' calculations show that 21 tons of nitrogen oxides would be eliminated daily if tiles on one million roofs were coated with their titanium dioxide mixture. The researchers coated two identical, off-the-shelf clay tiles with different amounts of titanium dioxide, a common compound found in everything from paint to food to cosmetics. The tiles were then placed inside a miniature atmospheric chamber that the students built out of wood, Teflon, and PVC piping.The chamber was connected to a source of nitrogen oxides and a device that reads concentrations of nitrogen oxides. The students used ultraviolet light to simulate sunlight, which activates the titanium dioxide and allows it to break down the nitrogen oxides. They found the titanium dioxide coated tiles removed between 88 percent and 97 percent of the nitrogen oxides.SourceAlso: Learn about Spectroscopic Determination of Trace Contaminants in High-Purity Oxygen.

Posted in: Remediation Technologies, Green Design & Manufacturing, Materials, Coatings & Adhesives, Test & Measurement, News

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Aircraft Wings Change Shape in Flight

The EU project SARISTU (Smart Intelligent Aircraft Structures) aims to reduce kerosene consumption by six percent, and integrating flexible landing devices into aircraft wings is one step towards that target. A new mechanism alters the landing flap’s shape to dynamically accommodate the airflow. Algorithms to control the required shape modifications in flight were programmed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems ENAS in Chemnitz, in collaboration with colleagues from the Italian Aerospace Research Center (CIRA) and the University of Naples."We’ve come up with a silicon skin with alternate rigid and soft zones,” Said Andreas Lühring from Fraunhofer IFAM. “There are five hard and three soft zones, enclosed within a silicon skin cover extending over the top.”The mechanism sits underneath the soft zones, the areas that are most distended. While the novel design is noteworthy, it is the material itself that stands out, since the flexible parts are made of elastomeric foam that retains their elasticity even at temperatures ranging from -55 to 80° Celsius.Four 90-centimeter-long prototypes — two of which feature skin segments — are already undergoing testing.SourceAlso: Learn about Active Wing Shaping Control.

Posted in: Materials, Mechanical Components, Aerospace, Aviation, News

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NASA Balloons Study Effects of Volcanic Eruption

A team of NASA and University of Wyoming scientists has ventured into the Australian bush to send a series of balloons aloft. The balloons will make measurements of a volcanic plume originating from neighboring Indonesia.The campaign, in Australia’s Northern Territory, is part of an effort to better understand the climate effects of volcanic eruptions.The KlAsh (Kelud Ash) experiment is based in Darwin, Australia, where smaller balloon payloads are being launched over the Indian Ocean. Larger balloons, with payloads that must be recovered, are being launched from Corroboree, a remote area about 60 miles south of Darwin.The larger balloon, filled with helium, measures about 115 by 65 feet when fully inflated.Almost all of the energy entering Earth’s climate system comes from the sun. Some of that energy is absorbed by the planet, while the rest is radiated back into space. Ash and sulfate reflect and absorb energy differently, and may also have different chemical impacts on the stratosphere.“Understanding those characteristics is important for climate models that include periodic volcanic activity,” said Terry Deshler, principal investigator for the University of Wyoming’s instrumentation.SourceAlso: Learn about Targeting and Monitoring of Volcanic Activity.

Posted in: Environmental Monitoring, Green Design & Manufacturing, Test & Measurement, Monitoring, News

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