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Miniature Laser Doppler Velocimeter for Measuring Wall Shear

Interference fringes are configured for sensitivity to a velocity gradient.

Posted in: Physical Sciences, Briefs

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Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

Atom skimmers act as conduits and low-pass velocity filters.

Posted in: Physical Sciences, Briefs

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Gears Based on Carbon Nanotubes

Nanometer size gears could be used in molecular-scale machines.

Posted in: Physical Sciences, Briefs, TSP

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Dielectric Heaters for Testing Spacecraft Nuclear Reactors

A document proposes the development of radio-frequency- (RF)-driven dielectric heaters for non-nuclear thermal testing of the cores of nuclear-fission reactors for spacecraft.

Posted in: Test & Measurement, Briefs, TSP

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NASA Experiment Studies Next-Generation Smoke Detectors

A candle flame in Earth’s gravity (left) and microgravity (right) show the difference in the processes of combustion in microgravity. (NASA/Glenn Research Center)As frightening as a fire is on Earth, it’s even scarier in space. “If a chair is on fire in your home, you have time to get out. In a spacecraft, you don’t,” said NASA scientist Dr. David Urban. “You have to detect smoke in an early pre-fire state, so you can stop it before it starts.”

Posted in: UpFront

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NASA Studies Paper-Like Plastic for Space Electronics

On the right is an antenna array embedded on liquid crystal polymer (LCP); a large sheet of LCP is on the left. (Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek)NASA’s Earth Science Technology Office and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) are evaluating a material called liquid crystal polymer (LCP) for electronics applications in space, as well as possible uses in consumer electronics. The ultra-thin, paper-like plastic can incorporate a variety of electronic circuits, while still molding to any shape. It also performs well in extreme temperatures and intense radiation found in space.

Posted in: UpFront

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NASA Teams With Army to Analyze Helicopter Parts Failure

From left: James Van Hoose and Dr. Po Chen, engineers with Qualis Corporation inThe Materials and Processes Laboratory at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center has partnered with the Aviation Engineering Directorate of the U.S. Army’s Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center to conduct failure analysis on helicopter parts. Using Marshall’s capabilities in metallurgy, the lab analyzed aircraft components such as engine parts, swash plates, and fasteners from Army helicopters that flew in the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. It was found that the parts all experienced some type of failure with metal castings, forgings, or extrusions.

Posted in: UpFront

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