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3-D Highway in the Sky

If it were 50 years ago, NASA's contribution to rock and roll could have been more than just the all-astronaut rock band, Max Q, composed of six NASA astronauts, all of whom have flown aboard the Space Shuttle. If it were 50 years ago, a new NASA spinoff technology, Synthetic Vision, would likely have been able to prevent the fateful, small plane crash that killed rock and roll legends Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and The Big Bopper on that stormy night in 1959. Synthetic Vision is a new cockpit display system that helps pilots fly through bad weather, and it has incredible life-saving potential.

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White Papers

Confronting the Antenna Challenges in Today's Military Applications Antenna engineers are now face increasingly difficult concerns regarding directionality, frequency variations, isolation, and testing. This paper from Emerson & Cuming Microwave Products describes how the use of microwave absorbers and dielectric materials can offer today's antenna engineers solutions to address these challenges.

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Current Attractions

In a crash, keeping the occupants alive and uninjured is paramount. As a part of the Structural Dynamics Branch in the Research and Technology Directorate at NASA Langley, the Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) tests the safety of aircraft by crashing them. Dr. Karen Jackson is part of the research team.

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Technology Business Brief

Lightweight, High-Performance Propeller/Rotor/Wind Turbine Blade The turbine blade features a much lighter, more efficient, less expensive, and entirely new structural design. Other advantages offered by this technology include increased performance, lower noise, decreased maintenance time and expense, and optimized electronic pitch control. View this brief here.

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NASA News

NASA's new Science Mission Directorate Associate Administrator Alan Stern has appointed NASA scientist and 2006 Nobel Prize recipient John Mather to lead the Office of the Chief Scientist at Headquarters in Washington, DC. Mather and his staff will be chief advisors to Stern. Office responsibilities will include assisting the associate administrator in setting flight mission and research budget priorities for all NASA science programs. The office will help develop and enhance discussions with the national and international science community. In 2006, Mather and George Smoot of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley, CA) received the Nobel Prize for Physics for their collaborative work in understanding the Big Bang.

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Hydrogen Sensors Boost Hybrids; Today's Models Losing Gas?

Advanced chemical sensors are used in aeronautic and space applications to provide safety monitoring, emission monitoring, and fire detection. In order to fully do their jobs, these sensors must be able to operate in a range of environments. NASA has developed sensor technologies addressing these needs with the intent of improving safety, optimizing combustion efficiencies, and controlling emissions.

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Secure Networks for First Responders and Special Forces

When NASA needed help better securing its communications with orbiting satellites, the Agency called on Western DataCom Co., Inc., to help develop a prototype Internet Protocol (IP) router.

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