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Data Loggers Store and Record Critical Data for NASA Experiments

Precision temperature data loggers Veriteq Instruments Richmond, BC, Canada 604-273-6850 www.veriteq.com

Posted in: Application Briefs

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Monitoring System Helps Astronauts Sleep on Space Station

VivoMetrics® LifeShirt System ambulatory monitoring system VivoMetrics Ventura, CA 805-667-2225 www.vivometrics.com

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Camera System Inspects Shuttle and Space Station

Laser Camera System (LCS) Neptec Design Group Houston, TX 281-280-8555 www.neptec.com

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Interferometer Enables Precision Metrology on James Webb Space Telescope

SpeckleCam Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometer (ESPI) 4D Technology Tucson, AZ 520-294-5600 www.4dtechnology.com

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Mars Exploration Rovers Use Amplifier System to Transmit Information

580412 SE 20 Power Amplifier Package StratEdge Corp. San Diego, CA 858-569-5000 www.stratedge.com

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Position Sensors Help Cassini Mission Provide Clues to Planetary Formation

Potentiometers Novotechnik U.S. Southborough, MA 508-485-2244 www.novotechnik.com

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Flexible Cryogenic Temperature and Liquid-Level Probes

These probes can be readily customized. Lightweight, flexible probes have been developed for measuring temperatures at multiple locations in tanks that contain possibly pressurized cryogenic fluids. If the fluid in a given tank is subcritical (that is, if it consists of a liquid and its vapor), then in one of two modes of operation, the temperature measurements made by a probe of this type can be used to deduce the approximate level of the liquid. The temperature sensors are silicon diodes located at intervals along a probe. If the probe is to be used to measure a temperature gradient along a given axis in the tank, then the probe must be mounted along that axis. In the temperature-measurement mode, a constant small electric current is applied to each diode and the voltage across the diode — a known function of the current and temperature — is measured as an indication of its temperature. For the purpose of this measurement, “small electric current” signifies a current that is not large enough to cause a significant increase in the measured temperature. More specifically, the probe design calls for a current of 10 µA, which, in the cryogenic temperature range of interest, generates heat at a rate of only about 0.01 mW per diode.

Posted in: Test & Measurement, Briefs

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