Special Coverage

Technique Provides Security for Multi-Robot Systems
Bringing New Vision to Laser Material Processing Systems
NASA Tests Lasers’ Ability to Transmit Data from Space
Converting from Hydraulic Cylinders to Electric Actuators
Automating Optimization and Design Tasks Across Disciplines
Vibration Tables Shake Up Aerospace and Car Testing
Supercomputer Cooling System Uses Refrigerant to Replace Water
Computer Chips Calculate and Store in an Integrated Unit
Electron-to-Photon Communication for Quantum Computing

Machine Vision Cameras

Sony Electronics, Park Ridge, NJ, has released the XCI Series Smart Cameras for machine vision applications that include color capabilities. The four new cameras are offered in VGA and SXGA resolutions, in color or monochrome. Other features include support for C and CS mounts, additional SDRAM memory, and ×86 CPU performance. The digital I/O includes two USB 2.0 ports and Gigabit Ethernet. The Windows® XPe models have an open architecture.

Posted in: Products, Imaging
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CMOS USB Camera

Lumenera Corp., Ottawa, ON, Canada, offers the Lm085 mini CMOS USB 2.0 camera for industrial applications with high-contrast-light scenes, tight space constraints, and rugged environmental conditions. The camera can be used in areas with variable lighting conditions and provides a dynamic range of 100 dB. It features a form factor of 44 × 44 × 56 mm, an electronic global shutter that eliminates the smear effect generated by moving objects, and a locking mini USB and RJ45 GPIO connectors that keep cables attached to the camera back plate.

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NNEC

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Nanoparticles Speed Light

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Polymer Electric Storage

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Quantum Dots

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Telltale Fish Embryos

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Pinhole Camera

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Lab-On-A-Chip

A new type of device called a "lab-on-a-chip" could result in a future generation of instant home tests for illnesses, food contaminants and toxic gases. But today these portable, efficient tools are often stuck in the lab themselves. Specifically, in the labs of researchers who know how to make them from scratch. University of Michigan engineers are seeking to change that with a 16-piece lab-on-a-chip kit that brings microfluidic devices to the scientific masses. The kit cuts the costs involved and the time it takes to make a microfluidic device from days to minutes.

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Exhaustible Energy

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