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Look Sharp While Seeing Sharp

While fashion styles are known to come and go, a certain 'shade' from the past has proved otherwise.

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Microspheres in Plasma Display Panels

NASA does things that have never been done before—sending spacecraft to other planets, sending people to the Moon, and exploring the limits of the universe. To accomplish these scientific missions, engineers at work within the Space Agency build machines and equipment that have never been made before—rockets that can send advanced instruments across the solar system, giant telescopes that watch the stars from space, and spacecraft that can keep astronauts safe from the perils of space flight. To do these never-before-done deeds with these never-before-made materials, NASA often needs to start at the basics and create its own textiles and materials. The engineers and materials specialists at the Space Agency are, therefore, among the best in the world.

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Inferring Gear Damage From Oil-Debris and Vibration Data

Data fusion increases the reliability and reduces the difficulty of gear-damage diagnosis. system for real-time detection of surface- fatigue-pitting damage to gears for use in a helicopter transmission is based on fuzzy-logic used to fuse data from sensors that measure oil-borne debris, referred to as “oil debris” in the article, and vibration signatures. A system to detect helicopter-transmission gear damage is beneficial because the power train of a helicopter is essential for propulsion, lift, and maneuvering, hence, the integrity of the transmission is critical to helicopter safety. To enable detection of an impending transmission failure, an ideal diagnostic system should provide real-time monitoring of the “health” of the transmission, be capable of a high level of reliable detection (with minimization of false alarms), and provide human users with clear information on the health of the system without making it necessary for them to interpret large amounts of sensor data.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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User Interactive Software for Analysis of Human Physiological Data

Ambulatory physiological monitoring has been used to study human health and performance in space and in a variety of Earth-based environments (e.g., military aircraft, armored vehicles, small groups in isolation, and patients). Large, multi-channel data files are typically recorded in these environments, and these files often require the removal of contaminated data prior to processing and analyses.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Self-Deployable Spring-Strip Booms

These structures can be stowed compactly with small forces and become rigid once deployed. Booms and other structures consisting mainly of thin spring strips are undergoing development. These structures are designed to be lightweight, to be compactly stowable, and to be capable of springing to stable configurations at full extension once released from stowage. Conceived for use as self-deploying structures in outer space, portable structures of this type may also be useful on Earth in applications in which there are requirements for light weight and small transportation volume.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Lightweight Energy Absorbers for Blast Containers

Aluminum foam liners tested for possible replacement of solid lead liners. Kinetic-energy- absorbing liners made of aluminum foam have been developed to replace solid lead liners in blast containers on the aft skirt of the solid rocket booster of the space shuttle. The blast containers are used to safely trap the debris from small explosions that are initiated at liftoff to sever frangible nuts on hold-down studs that secure the spacecraft to a mobile launch platform until liftoff.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Preventing Ice Before it Forms

NASA has always been on the cutting edge of aviation safety research, though many of the technologies the Agency develops also find practical application in ground transportation safety. One of the most prominent examples of this type of technology transfer is the grooved pavement developed by NASA in the early 1970s. While researching runway conditions, NASA scientists discovered that cutting narrow grooves into the surface of runways allowed rainwater to flow off of the tarmac, decreasing the troubles associated with wet, slick runways, including slipping, hydroplaning, poor handling, and reduced braking times.

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