Special Coverage

Technique Provides Security for Multi-Robot Systems
Bringing New Vision to Laser Material Processing Systems
NASA Tests Lasers’ Ability to Transmit Data from Space
Converting from Hydraulic Cylinders to Electric Actuators
Automating Optimization and Design Tasks Across Disciplines
Vibration Tables Shake Up Aerospace and Car Testing
Supercomputer Cooling System Uses Refrigerant to Replace Water
Computer Chips Calculate and Store in an Integrated Unit
Electron-to-Photon Communication for Quantum Computing

How 3D Printing Began, Layer by Layer

In 1983, Chuck Hull worked for a small California-based company that used ultraviolet light to turn liquid polymers into hardened, or cured, coatings. Inside the firm’s lab on his nights and weekends, Hull found a way to make UV-curable materials the basis for his Stereolithography Apparatus, patented the following year.

Tech Briefs spoke with Hull about the future of his invention, the 3D printer.

Posted in: News, Consumer Product Manufacturing, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling
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Top 3 Myths of Injection Molding

Rapid injection molding has changed the way product developers and design engineers use manufacturing. No longer is injection molding limited to traditional methods that are time consuming, expensive, and only ideal for larger part quantities. Over the last decade, manufacturing has evolved to allow low volumes of molded parts within days, and do so at a fraction of the traditional tooling cost.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars, Manufacturing & Prototyping
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The 3D Printing Landscape: Then and Now

Frequently used as a design validation and prototyping tool in its early days, the 3D printer now supports a much wider range of applications, from shape-conforming electronics to the creation of printed living tissue. Tech Briefs spoke with industry expert Terry Wohlers about 3D printing's emerging possibilities.

Posted in: News, News, News, Aerospace, Consumer Product Manufacturing, Custom & Contract Manufacturing, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Implants & Prosthetics
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3D Printing Applications for Medical Education and Training

3D printed multi-material models can replicate the complexity and wide range of patient pathology, making them superior tools for medical education. But how do 3D printed models compare to traditional training methods? In multiple peer reviews, users agree they can be an invaluable asset to training and better prepare practitioners for the clinical realm. The studies evaluated:

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Medical
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Will fog displays improve design processes?

Today’s lead INSIDER story addressed a new kind of 3D visualization: a shape-shifting fog display. Researcher and co-creator Diego Martinez said the technology enables new ways to collaborate, but the display will ultimately need to be “brought into the light, one step at a time, over years.” What do you think? Will fog displays improve design processes?

Posted in: Question of the Week, Displays/Monitors/HMIs
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Product of the Month: May 2017

Spectrum Instrumentation Corp. (Hackensack, NJ) introduced the DN6.44x, a range of 12 high-speed, 14-, and 16-bit LXI-based digitizers with up to 24 fully synchronized channels. The 16 bit ADC models offers sampling rates of either 130 MS/s or 250 MS/s, while the 14 bit units feature sampling rates of 500 MS/s. The units are suitable for applications where arrays of receivers, sensors, detectors, rectifiers, antennas and other electronic devices are to be used and tested. Each channel is also equipped with its own front-end amplifier that features six input ranges (from ±200 mV up to ±10 V full scale), switchable input impedance (50 Ω and 1 MΩ) and programmable positive input offset for unipolar signals. Analog bandwidth is as high as 250 MHz (for 500 MS/s models), enabling the units to capture electronic signals in the DC to 200 MHz frequency range. The instruments are equipped with a large on-board acquisition memory of 512 MSamples per channel.

For Free Info Click Here

Posted in: Products, Data Acquisition
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Free Whitepaper - Bioabsorbable Polymers in Medical Device Design

Bioabsorbable polymers play a key role in non-permanent implantable components and medical device design.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Bio-Medical, Medical
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Transmission Solutions to Optimize Future Powertrain Efficiency

In Conjunction with SAE

This 30-minute Webinar explores an innovative technology that delivers a continuously variable transmission (CVT) without the traditional limitations. Eliminating the belts and pulleys used in conventional CVTs, the technology features a unique planetary coaxial configuration that enables more than 300 transmission configuration possibilities, improving fuel economy by 5-10 percent.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars, Energy Efficiency
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Surface Texturing for Improved Medical Device Strength

Today’s implantables are highly engineered assemblies with multiple complex elements that require innovative materials and sophisticated manufacturing. The development and use of new and novel materials and processes have enabled advances in both medical device performance and patient safety. Whether it’s a lighter material, a smoother surface, or a process that can be made automated and repeatable, advanced technologies such as scratch-free surfaces or specialized coatings for stimulation can help you extend or improve the life of your implantable device.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars, Medical
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Technical Webinar Series from the Editors of TBMG: Integrating Motion Control for Safe Robot Operation

Manufacturing is changing. Robots and autonomous systems are used in more and more applications every day – many in safety-critical settings. No longer are robots kept in cages; they are working side-by-side with their human co-workers. Ensuring the safety of both robots and humans is vital and must be addressed early in the design stage. Designing robots for these safety-critical applications requires careful consideration of all aspects of the system, including proper motion control technologies that enable robots to maneuver in tight spaces originally designed for humans. Modifying standards for robot safety and human/robot interaction also must be a continuous process as these systems "learn."

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars, Motion Control
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