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Would you implant a technology under your skin?

This week's Question: During a speech at last week's Sensors Expo in Long Beach, California, keynote speaker and NewDealDesign technology designer Gadi Amit explained a new concept that he believes could be the next step in wearable technology. The idea, Project Underskin, is an implantable device that places a display within your palm. Powered by the body's electro-chemical energy, the proposed technology would enable the control of your various wearable devices. Specific quadrants of the device, for example, could act as a glucose sensor, a door opener, a payment confirmation, a data transfer, or a display of your emotional state. Amit imagines that the concept is five to ten years away from reality. What do you think? Would you implant a technology under your skin?

Posted in: Question of the Week

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Inkjet Technology Prints 'Soft Robot' Circuits

A new potential manufacturing approach from Purdue University researchers harnesses inkjet printing to create devices made of liquid alloys. The resulting stretchable electronics are compatible with soft machines, such as robots that must squeeze through small spaces, or wearable electronics.

Posted in: News, News, Surgical Robotics/Instruments

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Engineer Creates Origami Battery

A Binghamton engineer, Seokheun "Sean" Choi, developed an inexpensive, bacteria-powered battery made from paper. Using a drop of bacteria-containing liquid, the battery generates power from microbial respiration and delivers enough energy to run a paper-based biosensor.

Posted in: News

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Why Surface Contact Pressure In Your Manufacturing Process Matters

This white paper explore the various methods available for measuring tactile surface pressure between contacting or impacting surfaces. Knowledge of the distribution of pressure between contacting surfaces is integral to ensuring the highest quality product with minimal production losses.  Many types of technologies specialize in the recording and analyzing of tactile surface pressure and this paper describes the pros and cons of each type.

Posted in: White Papers, Data Acquisition, Sensors

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Coming Soon - Make Realistic Prototypes in Less Time with Multi-Material 3D Printing

Creating prototypes that look and feel like their production counterparts greatly reduces the product development cycle and makes communication of design ideas much more effective. Most prototypes, however, are made from multiple parts that need to be assembled, which takes time.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

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Coming Soon - Multiphysics Flow Simulations

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is often included in multiphysics analyses as a way to understand fluid flow, as well as being the convective mode for other physics. In this webinar, we will explain how to simulate CFD applications in COMSOL Multiphysics® including laminar, turbulent, and multiphase flows interacting with structures (FSI). We will also examine mass transport, electromagnetics, and heat transfer.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

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Coming Soon - Fast, On-Demand Jig & Fixture Production with PolyJet

Jigs and fixtures are an essential part of the manufacturing process that are used to position, hold and check parts and assemblies. But making them with traditional methods and materials is often costly and time consuming. PolyJet 3D printing technology offers an alternative that is much more economical and time-efficient, allowing you to quickly make jigs and fixtures as they’re needed. In this webinar you’ll learn more about these and other benefits of PolyJet 3D printed jigs and fixtures.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

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White Papers

Why bigger isn’t always better: the case for thin section bearings
Sponsored by Kaydon
Reverse Engineering
Sponsored by Servometer
How Do You Assess Image Quality?
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Free Guide to High Performance Switching
Sponsored by Keithley
Force Sensors for Design
Sponsored by Tekscan
X-Ray Imaging: Emerging Digital Technology - CMOS Detectors
Sponsored by Teledyne DALSA

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