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Dr. Vadim Smelyanskiy, Principal Scientist, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA

Dr. Vadim Smelyanskiy, Principal Scientist, Ames research Center, Moffett Field, CA Dr. Vadim Smelyanskiy is a principal scientist for physics-based methods in the Exploration Technology Directorate at NASA Ames Research Center. During his tenure at NASA, he has been the principal investigator on several projects funded by NASA and other government agencies.

Posted in: Who's Who

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Coming Soon - Scripted Analysis of Charged Particle Beams Passing through Electromagnetic Fields

When a charged particle beam passes through electromagnetic fields in a device, the size and shape of the beam vary at any given distance along the beam axis.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

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Vote on NASA's Next Spacesuit Design

NASA's Z-2 Suit is the newest prototype in its next-generation spacesuit platform, the Z-series. The surface-specific planetary mobility suit is the first to be tested in full vacuum. The prototype used 3D human laser scans and 3D-printed hardware for suit development and sizing. The suit-port concept is integrated with a hard upper torso suit structure.The cover layer of a prototype suit is important as it serves to protect the suit against abrasion and snags during the rigors of testing.  NASA is leaving the design up to you. Choose which of three candidates will be built. The deadline is April 15.Vote now.

Posted in: News

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Will 'Smell Notes' Catch On?

Set for a beta launch in July, a new "oPhone" app allows users to compose and send notes containing aromas. The free app lets user send the smell note by text or email, based on a set menu of scents contained in 'Ochips.' The message can be received like a typical text from a mobile device, and recipients can then download the composition from hotspots, which will be set up in the launch city of Boston. Creators of the technology see potential for the scent technology as a new type of self-expression, and possibly even a new language that may be used together with music, books, and other kinds of art.

Posted in: Question of the Week

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Connectors Outperform Hardwiring for Manufacturers and Their Customers

Many thousands of equipment manufacturers have switched from point-to-point (hard) wiring to connector-based cable assemblies in factory and process automation and control systems. Adopting progressive connectivity solutions has improved their unit costs and productivity. It allows them to turn around orders and complete installations much faster. With margins under increasing pressure, many OEMs have come to regard these benefits as a must-have. For many of their customers, the principal argument for connector-based wiring over hardwiring – a lower total cost of ownership over the service life of the machine – is equally compelling.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, White Papers

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Coming Soon - Interactive Display Provides Pilots with Real-Time Sonic Boom Information

Ed Haering at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center and Ken Plotkin at Wyle have developed a software system capable of displaying the location and intensity of shock waves caused by supersonic aircraft. This technology can be integrated into cockpits or ground-based control rooms to help pilots place any loud booms in a specific location, minimizing their impact in populated areas. The system processes vehicle and flight parameters as well as data regarding current atmospheric conditions. The display provides real-time information regarding sonic boom location and intensity, enabling pilots to make the necessary flight adjustments to control the timing and location of sonic booms. This technology, which will play a key role in enabling supersonic overland flight, can be used on current-generation supersonic aircraft, which generate loud sonic booms, as well as future-generation low-boom aircraft, anticipated to be quiet enough to allow use over populated areas.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

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New Airborne GPS Improves Weather Models

By designing a new GPS system aboard airplanes, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers will improve weather models and hurricane forecasting by detecting precise conditions in the atmosphere.Current measurement systems that use GPS satellite signals as a source to probe the atmosphere rely on GPS receivers that are fixed to ground and cannot measure over the ocean, or they rely on GPS receivers that are also on satellites that are expensive to launch and only occasionally measure in regions near storms. The new system, led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography geophysicist Jennifer Haase and her colleagues, captures detailed meteorological readings at different elevations at targeted areas of interest, such as over the Atlantic Ocean in regions where hurricanes might develop.“This field campaign demonstrated the potential for creating an entirely new operational atmospheric observing system for precise moisture profiling from commercial aircraft,” said Haase, an associate researcher with the Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Physics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) at Scripps. SourceAlso: Learn about GPS Estimates of Integrated Weather Forecasters.

Posted in: News

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