Special Coverage

Home

HEARING IN TRUE 3-D

In 1984, researchers from Ames Research Center came together to develop advanced human interfaces for NASA's teleoperations that would come to be known as virtual reality. The basis of the work theorized that if the sensory interfaces met a certain threshold and sufficiently supported each other, then the operator would feel present in the remote/synthetic environment, rather than present in their physical location. Twenty years later, this prolific research continues to pay dividends to society in the form of cutting-edge virtual reality products, such as an interactive audio simulation system.

Posted in: NTB, Spinoff

Read More >>

CONVERSING WITH COMPUTERS

I/NET, Inc., is making the dream of natural human-computer conversation a practical reality. Through a combination of advanced artificial intelligence research and practical software design, I/NET has taken the complexity out of developing advanced, natural language interfaces. Conversational capabilities like pronoun resolution, anaphora and ellipsis processing, and dialog management that were once available only in the laboratory can now be brought to any application with any speech recognition system using I/NET's conversational engine middleware.

Posted in: NTB, Spinoff

Read More >>

MANAGING CONTENT IN A MATTER OF MINUTES

NASA software created to help scientists expeditiously search and organize their research documents is now aiding compliance personnel, law enforcement investigators, and the general public in their efforts to search, store, manage, and retrieve documents more efficiently.

Posted in: NTB, Spinoff

Read More >>

NASA Tech Briefs Free Webinar

Specialty Lubrication in New Product Design Wednesday, September 19, 2007, 2:00 PM EST Lubricants are often the forgotten components in the design of moving elements. Last-minute redesign and changes can be avoided by considering lubricant performance needs during the design phase. High-performance equipment generates more local heat because of the higher speeds and loads in smaller components. Traditional lubricants that may have worked in the past often fail in the next-generation component causing delays in product launch or significant customer dissatisfaction during use. By using premium, high-performance synthetic lubricants, improved performance and extended life can be achieved. Sponsored by DuPont, NASA Tech Briefs presents this FREE webinar, which will: - Review characteristics of true high-temperature/high-performance lubricants. - Describe applications that have benefited from improved lubrication performance. Visit here for more info and to register.

Posted in: Blog

Read More >>

Innovate and Win!

The 2007 Create the Future Design Contest, presented by SolidWorks Corp. and NASA Tech Briefs, is now open for entries in these categories: Machinery, Equipment, and Component Technology; Consumer Products; Medical; Safety and Security; Transportation; and Sustainable Technologies. The sixth annual Create the Future design contest recognizes outstanding innovations in product design, awarding a Grand Prize of $20,000, and six First Prizes (one from each category) of Hewlett-Packard engineering workstations. Entrants may elect to have their entry posted on the contest Web site, and the 10 most-visited entries will each be awarded $250. All qualified entrants will receive a Create the Future Design Contest T-shirt. The contest is co-sponsored by COMSOL Inc., Hewlett-Packard Co. and the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. So, exercise your imagination and submit your innovative design ideas today. All entries must be received by October 15, 2007. Click here for guidelines, tips on winning, and the official entry form.

Posted in: Blog

Read More >>

FROM VIDEO TO PHOTO

Ever wonder whether a still shot from a home video could serve as a picture perfect photograph worthy of being framed and proudly displayed on the mantle? Wonder no more.

Posted in: NTB, Spinoff

Read More >>

Engineered Blood Vessels

Blood vessels that have been tissue-engineered from bone marrow adult stem cells may serve as a patient's source of new blood vessels following a coronary bypass or other procedures that require vessel replacement. A team of researchers from the University at Buffalo Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering have demonstrated the potential for eventually growing tissue-engineered vessels out of stem cells harvested from patients, providing an alternative to grafts now done in patients undergoing coronary bypass operations. Vein grafts cause pain and discomfort at the donor sight, have a high failure rate of 10 years, and there is limited availability of vessels. The UB team developed a method for isolating functional smooth muscle cells from bone marrow by using a fluorescent marker protein and a tissue-specific promoter for alpha-actin, a protein found in muscles that is responsible for their ability to contract and relax. The tissue-engineered vessels (TEVs) performed similarly to native tissue in their morphology, their expression of several smooth muscle cell proteins, the ability to proliferate, and the ability to contract in response to vasoconstrictors, one of the most important properties of blood vessels. The TEVs also produced both collagen and elastin, which give connective tissue their strength and elasticity, and are critical to the functioning of artificial blood vessels. Find out more here.

Posted in: Blog

Read More >>