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Fabrication of Gate-Electrode Integrated Carbon-Nanotube Bundle Field Emitters

Emission tips and a gate electrode are integrated into a monolithic device. Figure 1. A Gate Electrode Overhangs a recess containing an array of bundles of carbon nanotubes (see part a). In part (b) are scanning electron micrograph (SEM) images of fabricated field-emitter devices.A continuing effort to develop carbon- nanotube-based field emitters (cold cathodes) as high-current-density electron sources has yielded an optimized device design and a fabrication scheme to implement the design. One major element of the device design is to use a planar array of bundles of carbon nanotubes as the field-emission tips and to optimize the critical dimensions of the array (principally, heights of bundles and distances between them) to obtain high area-averaged current density and high reliability over a long operational lifetime — a concept that was discussed in more detail in “Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters” (NPO-40817), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 2 (February 2007), page 58. Another major element of the design is to configure the gate electrodes (anodes used to extract, accelerate, and/or focus electrons) as a ring that overhangs a recess wherein the bundles of nanotubes are located [see Figure 1(a)], such that by virtue of the proximity between the ring and the bundles, a relatively low applied potential suffices to generate the large electric field needed for emission of electrons.

Posted in: Briefs

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Dual-Input AND Gate From Single-Channel Thin-Film FET

These transistors show potential as large-area, low-cost electronic circuitry on rigid and flexible substrates. A regio-regular poly (3-hexylthiophene) (RRP3HT) thin-film transistor having a split-gate architecture has been fabricated on a doped silicon/silicon nitride substrate and characterized. RRP3HT is a semiconducting polymer that has a carrier mobility and on/off ratio when used in a field effect transistor (FET) configuration. This commercially available polymer is very soluble in common organic solvents and is easily processed to form uniform thin films. The most important polymer-based device fabricated and studied is the FET, since it forms the building block in logic circuits and switches for active matrix (light-emitting-diode) (LED) displays, smart cards, and radio frequency identification (RFID) cards.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Simulating Operation of a Complex Sensor Network

Simulation Tool for ASCTA Microsensor Network Architecture (STAMiNA) [“ASCTA” denotes the Advanced Sensors Collaborative Technology Alliance.] is a computer program for evaluating conceptual sensor networks deployed over terrain to provide military situational awareness. This or a similar program is needed because of the complexity of interactions among such diverse phenomena as sensing and communication portions of a network, deployment of sensor nodes, effects of terrain, data-fusion algorithms, and threat characteristics.

Posted in: Briefs

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Tactile Robotic Topographical Mapping Without Force or Contact Sensors

A “tap test” yields data on a succession of surface points. A method of topographical mapping of a local solid surface within the range of motion of a robot arm is based on detection of contact between the surface and the end effector (the fixture or tool at the tip of the robot arm). The method was conceived to enable mapping of local terrain by an exploratory robot on a remote planet, without need to incorporate delicate contact switches, force sensors, a vision system, or other additional, costly hardware. The method could also be used on Earth for determining the size and shape of an unknown surface in the vicinity of a robot, perhaps in an unanticipated situation in which other means of mapping (e.g., stereoscopic imaging or laser scanning with triangulation) are not available.

Posted in: Briefs

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Thin-Film Magnetic-Field-Response Fluid-Level Sensor for Non-Viscous Fluids

This sensor would be inexpensive and easy to fabricate. An innovative method has been developed for acquiring fluid-level measurements. This method eliminates the need for the fluid-level sensor to have a physical connection to a power source or to data acquisition equipment. The complete system consists of a lightweight, thin-film magnetic-field-response fluid-level sensor (see Figure 1) and a magnetic field response recorder that was described in “Magnetic-Field-Response Measurement-Acquisition System” (LAR-16908-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 6 (June 2006), page 28.

Posted in: Briefs

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Gas Sensors Based on Coated and Doped Carbon Nanotubes

Large specific surface areas of nanotubes could enable attainment of high sensitivities. Efforts are underway to develop inexpensive, low-power electronic sensors, based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), for measuring part-per-million and part-per-billion of selected gases (small molecules) at room temperature. Chemically unmodified SWCNTs are mostly unresponsive to typical gases that one might wish to detect. However, the electrical resistances of SWCNTs can be made to vary with concentrations of gases of interest by coating or doping the SWCNTs with suitable materials. Accordingly, the basic idea of the present development efforts is to incorporate thus-treated SWCNTs into electronic devices that measure their electrical resistances.

Posted in: Briefs

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Squirrel Stress



Posted in: Blog

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