Special Coverage

Home

Tech Needs of the Week

A small-scale enterprise is in need of mechanized processes and technologies designed for biological pre-processing (pre-conditioning) of basic wastes prior to composting with worms. The methods and equipment should be efficient, environmentally acceptable, ensure high performance, and be previously tested in practice. Click here to respond to this Tech Need. A technology is needed to remove all soil particles out of depressions and folds on biological surfaces, such as from under fingernails. The removal must be quick and safe for a human and easily applicable by a common user. Click here to respond to this Tech Need. The Technology Needs of the Week are anonymous requests for technology, distributed through the yet2.com marketplace, that you and your organization may be able to fulfill. Responding to a Tech Need is the first step to gaining an introduction with a prospective "buyer" for your technology solution.

Posted in: Blog

Read More >>

IMPROVING THE FLOW

In early 1995, NASA's Glenn Research Center (then Lewis Research Center) formed an industry-government team with several jet engine companies to develop the National Combustion Code (NCC), which would help aerospace engineers solve complex aerodynamics and combustion problems in gas turbine, rocket, and hypersonic engines. The original development team consisted of Allison Engine Company (now Rolls-Royce Allison), CFD Research Corporation, GE Aircraft Engines, Pratt and Whitney, and NASA. After the baseline beta version was established in July 1998, the team focused its efforts on consolidation, streamlining, and integration, as well as enhancement, evaluation, validation, and application. These activities, mainly conducted at NASA Glenn, led to the completion of NCC version 1.0 in October 2000.

Posted in: NTB, Spinoff

Read More >>

New Cancer Treatment

Biomedical engineers at Virginia Tech and the University of California Berkeley have developed a new minimally invasive method of treating cancer, and they anticipate clinical trials on individuals with prostate cancer will begin soon. The process is called irreversible electroporation (IRE). Electroporation is a phenomenon that increases the permeability of a cell from none, to a reversible opening, to an irreversible opening. With the latter, the cell will die. This irreversible concept was applied to the targeting of cancer cells. IRE removes tumors by irreversibly opening tumor cells through a series of short, intense electric pulses from small electrodes placed in or around the body, which creates permanent openings in the pores in the cells of the undesirable tissue. The openings eventually lead to the death of the cells without the use of chemotherapy drugs. Oncologists already use methods to destroy tumors using heat or freezing, but those techniques can damage healthy tissue or leave malignant cells. With IRE, researchers are able to adjust the electrical current and reliably kill the targeted cells. IRE is easy to apply, is not affected by local blood flow, and can be monitored and controlled using electrical impedance tomography. Click here for the full story.

Posted in: Blog

Read More >>

WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS IN SPACE

In 1992, NASA and the U.S. Department of Defense jointly commissioned the research and development of a technology solution to address the challenges and requirements of communicating with their spacecraft. The project yielded an international consortium composed of representatives from the space science community, industry, and academia. This group of experts developed a broad suite of protocols specifically designed for space-based communications, known today as Space Communications Protocol Standards (SCPS). Having been internationally standardized by the Consultative Committee on Space Data Systems and the International Standards Organization, SCPS is distributed as open source technology by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The protocols are used for every national space mission that takes place today.

Posted in: NTB, Spinoff

Read More >>

TREE-MENDOUS TIMBER EVALUATION

Funded and administered by NASA, the Affiliated Research Center (ARC) program transfers geospatial technologies from the Space Agency and participating universities to commercial companies, non-profit and trade organizations, and tribal governments. The origins of the ARC program date back to 1988, when NASA's Stennis Space Center initiated the Visiting Investigator Program to bring industry closer to spatial information technologies. The success of this trial program led to an expansion into the ARC program, whose goal is to enhance competitiveness of U.S. industries through more efficient use of remote sensing and related technologies.

Posted in: NTB, Spinoff

Read More >>

A VIEW FROM ABOVE WITHOUT LEAVING THE GROUND

In order to deliver accurate geospatial data and imagery to the remote sensing community, NASA is constantly developing new image-processing algorithms while refining existing ones for technical improvement. For 8 years, the NASA Regional Applications Center at Florida International University has served as a test bed for implementing and validating many of these algorithms, helping the Space Program to fulfill its strategic and educational goals in the area of remote sensing. The algorithms in return have helped the NASA Regional Applications Center develop comprehensive semantic database systems for data management, as well as new tools for disseminating geospatial information via the Internet.

Posted in: NTB, Spinoff

Read More >>

SECURING SAFETY WITH SENSORS

The Robot Systems Technology Branch at NASA's Johnson Space Center collaborated with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to design Robonaut , a humanoid robot developed to assist astronauts with Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) such as space structure assembly and repair operations. By working side-by-side with astronauts or going where risks are too great for people, Robonaut is expected to expand the Space Agency's ability for construction and discovery.

Posted in: NTB, Spinoff

Read More >>