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Bonded Magnets: A Versatile Class of Permanent Magnets

Permanent magnets are ubiquitous in modern societies. Devices which use permanent magnets include motors, sensors, actuators, acoustic transducers, etc. These are used in home appliances, speakers, office automation equipment, aerospace, wind turbine generators, medical laboratory diagnostic test equipment, and more. It is estimated, for example, that a typical automobile uses up to 120 permanent magnets in windshield wipers, starter motors, seat adjusters, door lock actuators, fuel pumps, sensors, gauges, etc. The development of Hybrid Electric Vehicle and Electric Vehicle drive technologies has been greatly enhanced by the availability of high performance magnetic materials.

Posted in: White Papers, Coatings & Adhesives

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Researchers Create Shape-Shifting Plastic

Researchers from Washington State University and the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Laboratory have created a tunable shape-memory polymer. The shape-shifting plastic can “remember” its original shape and return to it after being deformed with heat or other forces. The materials exhibit triple-shape memory behavior; the polymers can transform from one temporary shape to another temporary shape at one temperature, and then back to a permanent shape at another temperature. Changing the ratio of ingredients allows the researchers to control the overall properties of the material. The team’s method also uses off-the-shelf chemicals that can be easily scaled up to manufacture the material in bulk.Mixing the shape-memory polymers with other materials could produce stronger and stiffer composite parts that can later be recycled or reprocessed. Recyclable carbon fiber and glass fiber composites, for instance, are in high demand in the automotive industry.The material could also be used as binding glue for new types of rare earth-free magnets made from powders. The team is already experimenting with 3-D printing powder-based magnets with shape-memory polymers. Source Read other Materials & Coatings tech briefs.

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Coming Soon - Case Studies with Poly(p-xylylene) Polymers – Parylene Coated Elastomers

In this Webinar we will focus most of our attention on parylene coating of elastomers. You will see commercially viable solutions that enhance lubricity and ruggedize elastomeric components operating in challenging environments.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars, Coatings & Adhesives

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Technique Magnifies Vibrations in Bridges and Buildings

To the naked eye, buildings and bridges appear fixed in place, unmoved by forces like wind and rain. But in fact, these large structures do experience imperceptibly small vibrations that, depending on their frequency, may indicate instability or structural damage. MIT researchers have developed a technique to “see” vibrations that would otherwise be invisible to the naked eye, combining high-speed video with computer vision techniques.

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Researcher Develops World’s Smallest Micro Motor

Micro actuators are needed for numerous applications, ranging from mobile and wearable devices, to minimally invasive medical devices. However, the limitations associated with their fabrication have restricted their deployment at the one-millimeter scale.

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Lens Turns Smartphone into a Microscope

Researchers at the University of Houston have created an optical lens that can be placed on an inexpensive smartphone to amplify images by a magnitude of 120, all for just 3 cents a lens. The lens can work as a microscope, and the cost and ease of using it – it attaches directly to a smartphone camera lens, without the use of any additional device – make it ideal for use with students. It also could have clinical applications, allowing small or isolated clinics to share images with specialists located elsewhere.

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Ultrafast Camera Captures Images at the Speed of Light

An ultrafast camera can acquire two-dimensional images at 100 billion frames per second, a speed capable of revealing light pulses and other phenomena previously too fast to be observed. While other research groups have achieved higher frame rates (trillion f/s), this camera is the world’s fastest 2D camera that doesn’t require an external flash or multiple exposures.

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