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Product of the Month: September 2014

Dewetron, Wakefield, RI, has introduced the TrendCorder series of instruments designed for basic data acquisition applications in industry. They feature intuitive, multi-touch operation, enabling them to be operated 100% by touch, including alphanumeric entry, channel setup, and display configuration. When the instrument is turned on, an app loads and shows incoming data immediately. The DejaVIEW™ feature enables a user to scroll back on the recorder graph to any place in the recording, and pinch/zoom on the graph to see any detail, no matter how far back in time, without interrupting current recording. This is designed for operators conducting long-term testing that cannot be interrupted. The instruments feature a 15.4" wide aspect multi-touch display, and data is streamed continuously to disk at rates up to 200 MB/s. The TrendCorder has four slots for TRION series plug-in modules. Three 6-channel modules are included in the TRC-18, with one slot free; the TRC-6 has one 6-channel module, with three slots free. The system weighs 18.7 pounds, including the input modules.

Posted in: Products

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Rad-Hard PM Optical Fibers for Space Gyro Application

              Optical fiber gyroscopes for space require a small form (for tight winding), small beat length (for high extinguishing ratio) and radiation hardness. Here we demonstrate an optical fiber specialized for space gyro applications, combining our expertise in optical waveguide design, optical material design and manufacture, optical measurement, and modeling of complex degradation and failure phenomena.

Posted in: Tech Talks

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Electronic Noses Detect Chemical Warfare Gases

Researchers at the Polytechnic University of Valencia have developed a prototype electronic "nose" for the detection of chemical warfare gases, mainly nerve gas, such as Sarin, Soman, and Tabun.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Electronics, Sensors, Detectors, Data Acquisition, Defense, News

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What Limits Computers From Getting Smaller and More Powerful?

Computers have radically transformed industry, commerce, entertainment, and governance while shrinking to become ubiquitous handheld portals to the world.

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Fundamental Chemistry Could Help Extend Moore's Law

Over the years, computer chips have gotten smaller thanks to advances in materials science and manufacturing technologies. This march of progress, the doubling of transistors on a microprocessor roughly every two years, is called Moore's Law. But there's one component of the chip-making process in need of an overhaul if Moore's law is to continue: the chemical mixture called photoresist. Similar to film used in photography, photoresist, also just called resist, is used to lay down the patterns of ever-shrinking lines and features on a chip.

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Prosthetic Arm Controlled by Imagining a Motion

Controlling a prosthetic arm by just imagining a motion may be possible through the work of Mexican scientists at the Centre for Research and Advanced Studies. First, it is necessary to know if there is a memory pattern in the amputee's brain in order to know how the arm moved. The pattern is then translated to instructions for the prosthesis.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Electronics, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, News

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Would You Use A Biometric System to Make Your Purchases?

Many consumers are making transactions today with contactless cards and mobile payments. Quixter, a biometric system developed in Sweden, allows consumers to make purchases quickly by reading vein patterns in their palm. The shopper holds his or her hand over the device after entering the last four digits of a phone number.

Posted in: Question of the Week

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