3D-Printed Soft Robot ‘Walks’ on Any Terrain

Traditional robots often feature isolated mechanical joints. These discrete components limit a rover’s ability to traverse sand, stone, and other challenging environments.

A team at the University of California San Diego has demonstrated a more flexible option: a soft robot that lifts its legs over obstacles and operates on a variety of terrains. The 3D-printed quadrupedal technology may someday support search-and-rescue missions requiring intelligent navigation capabilities.

Posted in: News, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Materials, Automation, Robotics
Read More >>

Sound-Off: How are Collaborative Robots Being Used Today?

Are you seeing collaborative robots being integrated into today's production and manufacturing environments? Tech Briefs invites you to "Sound Off" on the role of "cobots."

Posted in: News, Robotics
Read More >>

What's New on Tech Briefs: Brickmaking on Mars a 'Smashing' Success

With support from Congress and the President, NASA aims to send a manned mission to Mars by 2040. Establishing a human presence on the Red Planet, however, will require permanent shelters.

And lugging a pile of bricks on the nine-month, 35-million-mile trip is out of the question.

Posted in: News, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling
Read More >>

Human-Robot Interaction: When Robotics Meets Philosophy

To support human-robot interaction, designers are taking a page from philosophy and studying how we work together with one another.

Posted in: News, Automation, Robotics
Read More >>

A Shape-Changing Display – Made from Fog

Researchers from the University of Sussex are the first to combine two cutting-edge visualization technologies in one: a fog screen and a shape-shifting display. The “MistForm” system, according to one of its creators, enables interaction capabilities that improve upon today’s virtual- and augmented-reality offerings.

Posted in: News, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Imaging
Read More >>

Tech Briefs Q&A: Photocatalyst Device Turns Pollution into Power

Researchers from the University of Antwerp and KU Leuven have built a proof-of-concept device that performs two noble functions simultaneously: purifying polluted air and generating power. Read the Tech Briefs Q&A with Professor Sammy Verbruggen.

Posted in: News, Energy, Energy Harvesting, Energy Storage, Renewable Energy, Solar Power
Read More >>

A New Material for Mars Habitats? Mars Itself

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego demonstrated a compaction technique that may someday be used to turn Mars soil into building blocks for the Red Planet. The scientists' new method of applying pressure offers construction possibilities as NASA plans manned Mars missions in the upcoming decades.

Posted in: News, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Materials
Read More >>

Coming Soon - What to Do After Finding a Positive BI in Your Routine EO Sterilization Cycle

Learn about the investigation, impact and outcome when receiving a positive Biological Indicator in your routine EO Sterilization cycle.

Posted in: Webinars, Upcoming Webinars, Medical
Read More >>

ASTM D4169: A Historical Perspective, plus Review and Implications of D4169-16

WESTPAK's protective package system testing professionals present a webinar focused on ASTM D4169. We begin with a historical perspective of D4169 and its origin to provide you with a background on protective package testing protocols. Then we review D4169-16 and compare it against the prior revisions. We discuss options available if your test fails the –16 revision after passing prior revisions. Live Q&A will be included during the broadcast.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars, Test & Measurement
Read More >>

3D Printed Tensegrity Object Can Change Shape

Researchers at Georgia Tech 3D printed an object made with tensegrity, a structural system of floating rods in compression and cables in continuous tension. (Credit: Rob Felt)

A team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a way to use 3D printers to create objects capable of shape change. The objects use tensegrity, a structural system of floating rods in compression and cables in continuous tension. The researchers fabricated the struts from shape memory polymers that unfold when heated. The technology could someday be used in applications ranging from space missions to biomedical devices.

Posted in: News, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Mechanical Components, Motion Control
Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.