Home

Designing for Stereolithography - 10 ways to Ready Your Part for Industrial 3D Printing

Designing for industrial-grade 3D printing has fewer considerations than traditional manufacturing processes; however, elements such as resolution, surface finish, feature size and build orientation can impact part performance.

Posted in: Tech Talks

Read More >>

Designing Smart Medical Devices with Force Sensing Technology

This session will explore the exciting new trend toward designing smart medical devices that provide critical force feedback to eliminate guesswork, improve outcomes, and increase consistency.

Posted in: Tech Talks

Read More >>

Stevan Spremo, Project Manager, COTSAT-1, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA

Stevan Spremo is the project manager of COTSAT-1, or Cost Optimized Test of Spacecraft Avionics and Technologies. The ongoing development project aims to build a fully functional spacecraft for $500,000 in parts and $2 million labor. The prototype is the first of what could be a series of rapidly produced, low-cost flight vehicles.

Posted in: Who's Who

Read More >>

Researchers Say Wood Windows Outshine Glass

In a University of Maryland study, researchers at the A. James Clark School of Engineering have demonstrated that windows made of transparent wood provide more consistent natural lighting and better energy efficiency than glass.    

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Lattice Structure Absorbs Propeller Vibrations

The vibration-absorbing lattice could one day be used in rockets. (3Dsculptor/Shutterstock/Jung-Chew Tse) Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a lattice structure capable of absorbing a wide range of vibrations while also being useful as a load-bearing component in propellers, rotors, and rockets. The three-dimensional lattice structure has a lattice spacing of around 3.5 mm, and was fabricated out of plastic using a 3D printer. Inside the lattice are steel cubes somewhat smaller than dice that act as resonators.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

NASA’s Pressure-Sensitive Paint Tests Aircraft Designs

An aircraft design is set up for wind tunnel testing in which pink pressure-sensitive paint is applied to the vehicle. The pink paint shines when exposed to blue light, glowing brighter or dimmer depending on air pressure in the area. NASA’s bright pink Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) is helping to test new aircraft designs. A thin coat of PSP is sprayed onto the model that will be tested in the wind tunnel and allowed to dry. The model is then installed in the wind tunnel, which also is equipped with a series of blue LED lights and specially equipped black and white cameras to record the test. With the wind tunnel active, air flows over the model, resulting in varying surface pressures.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Carbon Nanotube “Stitches” Strengthen Aircraft Composites

MIT aerospace engineers bond composite layers, producing a material that is substantially stronger and more resistant to damage than other advanced composites. (Illustration: Christine Daniloff/MIT) The newest passenger jets are made primarily from advanced composite materials such as carbon fiber reinforced plastic — extremely light, durable materials. But composite materials are also surprisingly vulnerable: the many layers in composites can break apart due to relatively small impacts. MIT aerospace engineers have found a way to bond composite layers in such a way that the resulting material is substantially stronger and more resistant to damage than other advanced composites.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.