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New Material Steals and Stores Oxygen from Air

Researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have synthesized crystalline materials that can bind and store oxygen in high concentrations.The stored oxygen can be released again when and where it is needed.Depending on the atmospheric oxygen content, temperature, or pressure, it takes seconds, minutes, hours, or days for the substance to absorb oxygen from its surroundings. Different versions of the substance can bind oxygen at different speeds. With this complexity, it becomes possible to produce devices that release and/or absorb oxygen under different circumstances — for example, a mask containing layers of these materials in the correct sequence might actively supply a person with oxygen directly from the air without the help of pumps or high pressure equipment."This could be valuable for lung patients who today must carry heavy oxygen tanks with them. But also divers may one day be able to leave the oxygen tanks at home and instead get oxygen from this material as it 'filters' and concentrates oxygen from surrounding air or water," said Christine McKenzie, professor at the University of Southern Denmark. "A few grains contain enough oxygen for one breath, and as the material can absorb oxygen from the water around the diver and supply the diver with it, the diver will not need to bring more than these few grains."SourceAlso: Read other Materials tech briefs.

Posted in: Materials, Medical, News

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Determining an Effective Analog Sampling Rate

Q: How often should my equipment make measurements? A: This question often arises when people draft plans to automatically measure a physical quantity such as temperature, pressure, acidity, liquid level, and so on. You can approach this problem in several ways, from an educated guess to a mathematical analysis of your system. The examples that follow use temperature measurements because people measure temperature more than any other physical characteristic.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, White Papers

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Refractory Metal Fasteners for Extreme Conditions: The Basics

There is a wide range of metal fasteners commonly available for standard applications, but what if your application is at very high temperature or in a highly corrosive environment? Sometimes the more commonly available fasteners are just not up to the job. Enter high-performance refractory metal fasteners. Refractory metal fasteners – nuts, bolts (also called screws or machine screws) and washers – are ideal for situations that involve high temperature, high voltage, magnetism and harsh corrosive environments.

Posted in: Materials, White Papers

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Infrared Cameras Enhance Productivity and Safety at GM

Nearly all electro-mechanical equipment becomes anomalously warm before it fails, making infrared (IR) cameras extremely effective diagnostic tools in the manufacturing environment. Inspections using infrared cameras can find many problems before failure occurs. In many cases, the time to failure can be projected, enabling the most convenient scheduling of proactive or preemptive repairs. This practice, called “predictive maintenance” (PdM), enhances both productivity and safety.

Posted in: Articles

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NASA Launch Pads Protected Against Lightning-Induced Power Surges

Circuit protection components Littelfuse Chicago, IL 773-628-1000 www.littelfuse.com Circuit protection is an essential part of any electrical or electronic product or system design. As the complexity of the product or system grows, circuit protection design becomes increasingly crucial. As circuitry is increasingly miniaturized, it’s more important than ever to protect it from damaging power surges. For engineers whose work is critical to the safety of a NASA mission, protecting the lives of crewmembers depends to no small extent on protecting delicate digital circuitry from hazards like electrostatic discharges and lightning-induced surges.

Posted in: Application Briefs

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Micro-Accelerometers Monitor Equipment Health

MEMS-based accelerometers used on the International Space Station to control the microgravity environment are also used to monitor industrial machinery. Objects that orbit the Earth, such as the International Space Station (ISS), provide a unique environment called zero-g, or more correctly, microgravity. All objects in orbit are pulled by Earth’s gravity, but they achieve the lack of gravity when they move at just the right speed (in the case of the ISS, around 17,500 miles per hour) so that the curve of their fall matches the curve of the Earth. The result is a perpetual freefall, creating weightlessness.

Posted in: Articles, Spinoff

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Nanosensor/Cellphone Hybrid for Detecting Chemicals and Concentrations

Based on solid-state technology, the sensor requires no reagents and can be refreshed with an ultraviolet diode. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California Nanosensors have been developed for chemical detection using carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Unlike other chemical sensors, this solid-state approach requires no reagents and can be refreshed with a solid-state ultraviolet (UV) diode. The sensors possess high sensitivity (ppbv), fast response (≈2 s), high selectivity, low power (μW), and very small size (1 cm2 or less based on advanced miniaturization), and they are ideally suited for integration with wireless networks or cellphone type devices.

Posted in: Physical Sciences, Sensors, Briefs

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