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Will Apps Like Timeful Improve Your Time Management Skills?

Timeful, a new iPhone app, syncs traditional time management tools, such as calendars and to-do lists. The app also reveals progress on tasks and illuminates how users are spending their hours at work and at home. The technology calculates how much time one needs to perform specific tasks and can recommend the best times to do them, based on its determination of when the Timeful customer is most productive.

Posted in: Question of the Week

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Coming Soon - The ANCER™ for Corrosion/Erosion Protection on Copper Micro Channel Coolers

Advanced Cooling Technologies (ACT) has developed a vapor deposited ANCER™ (Applied Nanoscale Corrosion Erosion Resistant) coating which has shown to provide superior protection of copper Micro Channel Coolers (MCCs) from catastrophic erosion/corrosion failure while cooling laser diodes. In this webinar, you will learn how corrosion and erosion effects can seriously impact MCC performance. You’ll learn how the thin, conformal ANCER™ coating offers a cost effective solution to extend the life of the copper microchannel coolers, even under relaxed DI water operating parameters. You will also see how the coating may be extended to provide corrosion resistance in other materials, such as aluminum. The webinar will be of value to thermal and mechanical engineers who are facing thermal and corrosion life challenges of their products.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

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Coming Soon - Using Novel Flash Infrared Thermography Techniques and Software

Researchers at NASA’s Johnson Space Center (JSC) have developed an infrared (IR) flash thermography software program that is capable of detecting and characterizing anomalies, such as voids, cracks, and delamination, in nonmetallic structures with higher fidelity and sensitivity than other available techniques. Using an innovative IR contrast methodology, this software extracts normalized contrast versus time evolutions from flash thermography IR video data to accurately measure flaw depth, width, and diameter.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

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Army to Get New IED Detector Technology

Detecting improvised explosive devices in Afghanistan requires constant, intensive monitoring using rugged equipment. When Sandia researchers first demonstrated a modified miniature synthetic aperture radar (MiniSAR) system to do just that, some experts didn't believe it. But those early doubts are long gone. Sandia's Copperhead — a highly modified MiniSAR system mounted on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) — has been uncovering IEDs in Afghanistan and Iraq since 2009. Now, according to senior manager Jim Hudgens, Sandia is transferring the technology to the U.S. Army to support combat military personnel.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Imaging, Sensors, Detectors, RF & Microwave Electronics, Antennas, Data Acquisition, Defense, News

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Tiny Laser Sensor Heightens Bomb Detection Sensitivity

A team of researchers led by Xiang Zhang, UC Berkeley professor of mechanical engineering, has found a way to dramatically increase the sensitivity of a light-based plasmon sensor to detect incredibly minute concentrations of explosives. The researchers noted that the sensor could potentially be used to sniff out a hard-to-detect explosive popular among terrorists. The engineers put the sensor to the test with various explosives — 2,4- dinitrotoluene (DNT), ammonium nitrate and nitrobenzene — and found that the device successfully detected the airborne chemicals at concentrations of 0.67 parts per billion, 0.4 parts per billion and 7.2 parts per million, respectively. One part per billion would be akin to a blade of grass on a football field. They noted that these results are much more sensitive than those published to date for other optical sensors.

Posted in: News

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Army Develops First-of-Its Kind Phase-Coherent Fiber Laser Array System

The U.S. Army Research Laboratory's Computational and Information Science Directorate's Intelligent Optics Team, and partners, recently developed, engineered, demonstrated and delivered the world's first known working Adaptive Phase Coherent Fiber Laser Array system, which will better enable soldiers' directed energy weapons and laser communication systems on the battlefield. The development of the system spurred from a collaborative agreement between U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Labs, Optonicus and various academic partners.

Posted in: News

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NASA 3D-Printing Process Transitions from Metal to Metal

Researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, are implementing a 3D-printing process that transitions from one metal or alloy to another in a single object. "You can have a continuous transition from alloy to alloy to alloy, and you can study a wide range of potential alloys," said R. Peter Dillon, a technologist at JPL. "We think it's going to change materials research in the future."Although gradient alloys have been created in the past in research and development settings, this is the first time these composite materials have been used in making objects, such as a mount for a mirror, said John Paul Borgonia, a JPL mechanical engineer.In their new technique, Hofmann and his colleagues deposit layers of metal on a rotating rod, thus transitioning metals from the inside out, rather than adding layers from bottom to top, as in the more traditional 3-D printing technique. A laser melts metal powder to create the layers. Future space missions may incorporate parts made with this technique.SourceAlso: Learn about a Shape-Memory-Alloy-Based Launch Lock.

Posted in: News

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