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Traceable Automation with Remote Display and Interruptible Scheduler Version 1.04.0

Many complex procedures can be completed more quickly, under controlled conditions, and without human intervention or error. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Traceable Automation with Remote Display and Interruptible Scheduler (TARDIS) is a software set designed for use in ground operations. TARDIS is a multi-mission automation framework that supports seamless integration of manual and automatic processing. It was developed to automate mission design and navigation (MDN) procedures, but is general enough to automate many other kinds of procedures as well. It allows users to define the tasks to run and the circumstances under which to run them. Thereafter, TARDIS watches the entire host computer and automatically runs the corresponding tasks as conditions change. It also watches the tasks as they run and logs their results. It provides a graphical user interface (GUI) front end, so users can monitor and control system state and task progress from any Web browser. As a result, many complex procedures can be completed more quickly, under controlled conditions, and without human intervention or error.

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Single Doppler Retrieval Toolkit (SingleDop)

Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama Single-Doppler retrieval of low-level, two-dimensional winds is desired to compare ground radar wind retrievals to satellite scatterometer wind retrievals. This needs to be integrated within the growing collection of open-source radar tools maintained by the Python Atmospheric/Ocean Sciences (PyAOS) community. SingleDop is a software module written in Python that retrieves 2D, low-level winds from either real or simulated Doppler radar data.

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Computing Efficient Onboard Analysis and Re-Scheduling

The objective is to speed up the responsiveness to onboard decision-making. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Prior space missions have not routinely used onboard decision-making. The Autonomous Sciencecraft (ASE), flying onboard the Earth Observing One spacecraft, has been flying autonomous agent software for the past decade that enables it to analyze acquired imagery onboard, and use that analysis to determine future imaging. However, ASE takes approximately one hour to analyze and respond.

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libSPRITE

Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama libSPRITE is a set of software libraries used in the development of software applications. The libraries provide components for encoding engineering units, math functions, a task scheduler built on top of pthreads, a publish/subscribe data distribution system, and a Lua scripting language interface.

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Object-Oriented FITS File Interface for MATLAB

Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland The ability to read complicated Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) files in MATLAB was required for analyzing data from the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) cryovac test campaign for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) project. This software was written to fill that specific need, but is more generally applicable.

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Space Station Research Explorer

This program presents experiments, facilities, and research results from the International Space Station in formats that could be easily understood by a wide audience. Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas The Space Station Research Explorer provides current information on International Space Station (ISS) experiments, facilities, and research results through video, photos, interactive media, and in-depth descriptions on iOS and Android devices.

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Integrated Circuit for Radio Astronomy Correlators Supporting Large Arrays of Antennas

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Radio telescopes that employ arrays of many antennas are in operation, and ever-larger ones are being designed and proposed. Signals from the antennas are combined by cross-correlation. While the cost of most components of the telescope is proportional to the number of antennas, N, the cost and power consumption of cross-correlation are proportional to N2, and dominate at sufficiently large N. As radio telescopes get larger, there is a need to provide digital-signal-processing electronics that are smaller and less power-hungry than would be implied by the extrapolation of existing designs.

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