Sound-Off: 'Big Data' Best Practices

There was a time when the R&D powertrain group at Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) would log up to 500 GB of data per day. How do you sift through such a large number of files? Anjelica Warren, Product Marketing Manager at National Instruments, reviews ways to spend less time analyzing data and creating reports.

Posted in: News, Data Acquisition
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‘Instantly Rechargeable’ Battery Drives New Electric Car Possibilities

A new battery system may someday allow drivers to recharge their cars as quickly and easily as filling up a gas tank.

Posted in: News, Automotive, Alternative Fuels, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Storage
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Researchers control adhesive material remotely with light

Adhesive mechanisms in the natural world, as used by geckos and other animals when they walk upside down on the ceiling, have many advantages. They are strongly adhesive – without glues or residues. Scientists at Kiel University are researching how these mechanisms can be artificially created. An interdisciplinary research team from Materials Science, Chemistry, and Biology has succeeded in developing a bio-inspired adhesive material that can be controlled remotely by using UV light. In this way, it’s possible to transport objects precisely in a micro-range. The findings could be interesting for applications in the fields of robotics, industry, and medical technology.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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‘Most stretchable 3D printable elastomer’ in the world

Due to its excellent material properties of elasticity, resilience, and electrical and thermal insulation, elastomers have been used in a myriad of applications. They are especially ideal for fabricating soft robots, flexible electronics, and smart biomedical devices that require soft, deformable material properties to establish safe, smooth interactions with humans externally and internally.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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What’s New on Tech Briefs: Can You Answer Our Readers’ Big Questions?

New web-exclusive stories this month highlight soft robots, bio-printing successes, and opportunities to answer readers' questions.

Posted in: News, Electronics & Computers, Information Sciences
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Sensors Detect Disease Markers in Breath

A small, thin square of organic plastic can detect disease markers in breath or toxins. The sensor chip can be used by patients and discarded.

Posted in: News, Detectors, Sensors
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One Plug-In Sensor Does Work of Many

Researchers have developed a sensor package that monitors multiple phenomena in a room using machine-learning techniques. The prototype contained 19 different sensor channels, including sensors that indirectly detect sound, vibration, motion, color, light intensity, speed, and direction. The sensor board is plugged in to a wall outlet, eliminating the need for batteries.

Posted in: News, Sensors
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Sound-Off: How Can Organizations Ensure Security in the Cloud?

A reader asks: "How can organizations that use cloud services maintain security of customer data?" See our expert's response — and write one of your own.

Posted in: News, Data Acquisition
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‘Creating the Future’: Water Purifier Requires Only Sunlight

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 780 million people do not have access to clean water sources. The inventor of a water-purification technology hopes to change that statistic and offer an affordable and sustainable way of addressing the global water crisis.

Posted in: News, News, Energy Harvesting, Renewable Energy, Solar Power
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Wearable System Guides Visually Impaired Users

A new wearable system from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology will help blind users navigate through indoor environments.

Posted in: MDB, News, News, Imaging, Sensors
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