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Transparent Skull Implant Could Replace Craniotomy

An illustration showing how the Window to the Brain transparent brain implant created by UC Riverside researchers would work. (Credit: UC San Diego) Researchers from several US and Mexican institutions are developing a transparent skull implant that will allow doctors to deliver laser-based treatments to the brain on demand and on a recurring basis without the need for surgeons to open up the skull, a highly invasive procedure called a craniotomy. The “Window to the Brain” would provide new treatment options for patients with life-threatening neurological disorders, including brain cancers, traumatic brain injuries, neurodegenerative diseases, and stroke.

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New “4D” MRI Technique Identifies Stroke Risk

4D flow CMR can be employed to measure in-vivo 3D blood flow dynamics in the heart and atria. Derived flow stasis maps in the left atrium and left atrial appendage are a novel concept to visualize and quantify regions with low flow, known to cause clot formation and risk for stroke. (Credit: Northwestern) A new imaging technique has been developed that can help predict who is most at risk for stroke. This breakthrough could lead to better treatment and outcomes for patients with atrial fibrillation. The cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging test can detect the blood’s velocity through the heart and body. Called “atrial 4D flow CMR,” the technique is noninvasive and does not require contrast agents.

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Visible-Light-Based Imaging for Medical Devices

In experiments, the researchers fired a laser beam through a mask — a thick sheet of plastic with slits cut through it in a certain configuration, such as the letter A — and then through a 1.5-cm “tissue phantom,” a slab of material designed to mimic the optical properties of human tissue for purposes of calibrating imaging systems. Light scattered by the tissue phantom was then collected by a high-speed camera, which could measure the light’s time of arrival. (Credit: Camera Culture Group/MIT) MIT researchers have developed a technique for recovering visual information from light that has scattered because of interactions with the environment — such as passing through human tissue. The technique could lead to medical imaging systems that use visible light, which carries much more information than X-rays or ultrasound waves.

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Glucose-Sensing Contact Lens Enables Noninvasive Testing

This illustration shows the schematic procedure for the fabrication of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering contact lens via transfer printing. Blood testing is the standard option for checking glucose levels, but a new technology could allow noninvasive testing via a contact lens that samples glucose levels in tears. Glucose is a good target for optical sensing, and especially for what is known as surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.

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3D-Printed Robots Feature Shock-Absorbing Skins

A “programmable viscoelastic material” (PVM) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) allows users to program every single part of a 3D-printed object, including exact levels of stiffness and elasticity.

Posted in: News, Machinery & Automation, Robotics

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Researchers Create Smallest Transistor Ever

A research team led by faculty scientist Ali Javey at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has created a transistor with a working 1-nanometer gate — the smallest to date.

Posted in: News, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, PCs/Portable Computers

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Air Force Is Developing Mach 18 Wind Tunnel

Mike Smith, AEDC optical diagnostic physicist, verifies the Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy system is functioning properly prior to conducting tests in support of risk reduction for a new test capability that will increase Mach number of AEDC Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9 at White Oak, Md. (U.S. Air Force photo/A.J. Spicer) The Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9 team is conducting tests in support of risk reduction for a new test capability that will be revolutionary for AEDC and the U.S. Air Force. The capability involves increasing the Mach number of what AEDC is currently able to achieve at Tunnel 9 in White Oak, Md., from Mach 14 to Mach 18.

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