Home

New System Allows Buildings to 'Sense' Internal Damage

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a computational model that makes sense of the ambient vibrations that travel up a structure as trucks and other forces rumble by. By picking out specific features in the noise that give indications of a building’s stability, the model may be used to continuously monitor a building for signs of damage or mechanical stress.

Posted in: News, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors

Read More >>

‘Robomussels’ Monitor Climate Change

Northeastern University scientist Brian Helmuth and other researchers have developed "robomussels" that monitor climate change. The tiny devices have miniature built-in sensor that track temperatures inside the mussel beds.

Posted in: News, Machinery & Automation, Robotics

Read More >>

Entry-Level PXI/PXIe Platforms

ADLINK Technology (San Jose, CA) announced new entry-level PXI and PXI Express (PXIe) platforms for PXI testing system startup users. PXES-2301 is an all-hybrid, 6-slot compact PXIe chassis with system bandwidth up to 8 GB/s. PXIe-3935 and PXI-3930 are embedded controllers with Intel® Celeron® 2000E 2.2GHz processors, delivering up to 50% increase in computing power and as much as eight times the bandwidth of available market offerings. ADLINK's PXIe-3935 and PXI-3930 significantly reduce maintenance burdens with easily replaceable battery and upgradable storage and SODIMM modules. Backup BIOS also eases recovery in the event of a main BIOS crash.Click here to learn more

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Scientists Find Twisting 3-D Electron Raceway in Nanoscale Crystal Slices

A scanning electron microscope image shows triangular (red) and rectangular (blue) samples of a semimetal crystal known as cadmium arsenide. The rectangular sample is about 0.8 microns (thousandths of a millimeter) thick, 3.2 microns tall and 5 microns long. The design of the triangular samples proved useful in mapping out the strange electron orbits exhibited by this material when exposed to a magnetic field. (Credit: Nature, 10.1038/nature18276) Researchers have created an exotic 3-D racetrack for electrons in ultrathin slices of a nanomaterial they fabricated at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The international team of scientists from Berkeley Lab, UC Berkeley, and Germany observed, for the first time, a unique behavior in which electrons rotate around one surface, then through the bulk of the material to its opposite surface and back.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Complex Materials Can Self-Organize Into Circuits

An ORNL study found that complex oxide materials can self-organize into electrical circuits, which creates the possibility for new types of computer chips. (Credit: ORNL) Researchers studying the behavior of nanoscale materials at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have uncovered remarkable behavior that could advance microprocessors beyond today’s silicon-based chips. The study shows that a single crystal complex oxide material, when confined to micro- and nanoscales, can act like a multi-component electrical circuit. This behavior stems from an unusual feature of certain complex oxides called phase separation, in which tiny regions in the material exhibit vastly different electronic and magnetic properties. It means individual nanoscale regions in complex oxide materials can behave as self-organized circuit elements, which could support new multifunctional types of computing architectures.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Chaos-Based Microchips Offer Possible Solution to Moore’s Law

Reconfigurable chaotic integrated circuit. (Credit: Behnam Kia) Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed new, nonlinear, chaos-based integrated circuits that enable computer chips to perform multiple functions with fewer transistors. These integrated circuits can be manufactured with “off the shelf” fabrication processes and could lead to novel computer architectures that do more with less circuitry and fewer transistors.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Image Processing Software

With the new EVT (Karlsruhe, Germany) EyeScan AT 3D, the EyeVision image processing software shows its new 3C commands and display options for the point cloud when inspecting connector pins. The system works for almost any connector to check the quality of the pins. The software measures connector tolerances and staggering of the pins, as well as pin depth in the housing. Thanks to the 3D-inspection it is possible to measure the height of the pin tip. And additionally the pin tips are not only measured in their x- and y-direction but also in z-direction. The system can also detect if the connector pins are straight or bent, if the pins are stuck too deeply into the housing or if the pins stick too far out of the housing.Click here to learn more

Posted in: News

Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.