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Scientists Find Twisting 3-D Electron Raceway in Nanoscale Crystal Slices

A scanning electron microscope image shows triangular (red) and rectangular (blue) samples of a semimetal crystal known as cadmium arsenide. The rectangular sample is about 0.8 microns (thousandths of a millimeter) thick, 3.2 microns tall and 5 microns long. The design of the triangular samples proved useful in mapping out the strange electron orbits exhibited by this material when exposed to a magnetic field. (Credit: Nature, 10.1038/nature18276) Researchers have created an exotic 3-D racetrack for electrons in ultrathin slices of a nanomaterial they fabricated at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The international team of scientists from Berkeley Lab, UC Berkeley, and Germany observed, for the first time, a unique behavior in which electrons rotate around one surface, then through the bulk of the material to its opposite surface and back.

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Complex Materials Can Self-Organize Into Circuits

An ORNL study found that complex oxide materials can self-organize into electrical circuits, which creates the possibility for new types of computer chips. (Credit: ORNL) Researchers studying the behavior of nanoscale materials at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have uncovered remarkable behavior that could advance microprocessors beyond today’s silicon-based chips. The study shows that a single crystal complex oxide material, when confined to micro- and nanoscales, can act like a multi-component electrical circuit. This behavior stems from an unusual feature of certain complex oxides called phase separation, in which tiny regions in the material exhibit vastly different electronic and magnetic properties. It means individual nanoscale regions in complex oxide materials can behave as self-organized circuit elements, which could support new multifunctional types of computing architectures.

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Chaos-Based Microchips Offer Possible Solution to Moore’s Law

Reconfigurable chaotic integrated circuit. (Credit: Behnam Kia) Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed new, nonlinear, chaos-based integrated circuits that enable computer chips to perform multiple functions with fewer transistors. These integrated circuits can be manufactured with “off the shelf” fabrication processes and could lead to novel computer architectures that do more with less circuitry and fewer transistors.

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Image Processing Software

With the new EVT (Karlsruhe, Germany) EyeScan AT 3D, the EyeVision image processing software shows its new 3C commands and display options for the point cloud when inspecting connector pins. The system works for almost any connector to check the quality of the pins. The software measures connector tolerances and staggering of the pins, as well as pin depth in the housing. Thanks to the 3D-inspection it is possible to measure the height of the pin tip. And additionally the pin tips are not only measured in their x- and y-direction but also in z-direction. The system can also detect if the connector pins are straight or bent, if the pins are stuck too deeply into the housing or if the pins stick too far out of the housing.Click here to learn more

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Single Photon Counting Camera

PHOTONIS (Roden, NL) announced the release of a new single photon counting camera ideal for fast imaging under light starved conditions, such as Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC). The camera features micrometer resolution, picosecond timing, a full 18mm wide field of view and a count rate as high as 5MHz with no added read noise. The Imaging Photon Camera combines state-of-the-art microchannel plate detector technologies and specially designed fast electronics. These components eliminate the problem of electron noise found in low-light digital sensor technologies such as EMCCD or sCMOS.Click here to learn more

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High-Speed Camera

Fastec Imaging’s (San Diego, CA) IL5 High-Speed 5MP Camera enables you to record production lines moving at high speed for analysis or troubleshooting using slow motion replay. There are four models to choose from, boasting crisp, clean video from 2560 x 2080 @ 230fps to 800 x 600 @ 1650fps. All models record over 3200 fps at VGA resolution and more than 18,000 fps at smaller resolutions. Able to save images to an SSD or SD card while recording high-speed bursts of hundreds or even thousands of images at a time.Click here to learn more

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Rugged Thermal Camera

Sierra-Olympic Technologies (Hood River, OR) recently introduced the Viento 67-640 thermal camera for perimeter surveillance, robotics, and other rugged outdoor imaging applications. The new thermal imager features a fixed focal length and fixed mount. With a 640 x 480, 17-micron thermal imaging core, it provides standard NTSC/PAL composite analog video output with simultaneous 8-bit / 14-bit Camera Link® digital output. The uncompressed digital output is for imaging applications that require full-fidelity data transmission. The Viento 67-640 is designed with an IP67-rated environmental housing.Click here to learn more

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