Strain-Detecting Composite Materials

These materials can be used in aerospace vehicles and aircraft, or in any application where monitoring total overload or localized strain is critical.

NASA Langley Research Center has developed a metallic material that can be embedded into structural alloys to enhance nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of a structure. Current NDE tools, such as eddy current probes and others, can have some difficulties detecting small flaws in certain materials and structures. Also, using them can be costly, time-consuming, and labor-intensive, often resulting in significant downtime in the case of examination of machinery and vehicles. This innovation is to embed particles that react to strain with easily detected acoustic emissions and change in magnetic properties.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials, On-board diagnostics, On-board diagnostics (OBD), Alloys, Composite materials, Non-destructive tests, Test equipment and instrumentation
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Micro-Fresnel Zone Plate Optical Devices Using Densely Accumulated Ray Points

NASA Langley Research Center has developed a novel approach for a high-density optical data storage system to advance the typical capabilities of an optical data storage system. Operating at any laser wavelength from infrared (IR), visible, ultraviolet (UV), and X-ray regimes, the NASA technology utilizes special beam focusing techniques to achieve extremely short focal lengths and ultra-small spot sizes. The technology could be used with any laser wavelength and soft X-ray regime, and can be adapted to take advantage of any optical media. The high-density data storage capability is solely a function of the reduced laser/X-ray spot size.

Posted in: Briefs, Photonics, Lasers, Optics, Waveguides, Data management
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Compositions Comprising Nickel-Titanium, Methods of Manufacture Thereof, and Articles Comprising the Same

These solid lubricant coatings provide reduced friction and wear to any lightly loaded sliding mechanism operating from cryogenic to 650 °C.

NASA's Glenn Research Center has developed high-temperature solid lubricant materials suitable for foil gas bearings that enable the commercialization of a broad array of revolutionary oil-free gas turbines, compressors, blowers, motors, and other rotating machines that can operate from cryogenic to redhot temperatures. These tribological (friction and wear) coatings and composite powder metallurgy material innovations have immediate and proven spinoff potential for high-temperature steam turbine control valves, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valves, articulating ducts and piping joints, and other industrial and aerospace applications.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials, Lubricants, Powder metallurgy, Nickel, Titanium, Tribology, Bearings
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Preparation of Metal Nanowire Decorated Carbon Allotropes

This technology produces materials for a variety of applications in electronics, communications, catalysis, and optics.

NASA's Langley Research Center has created a new class of materials based on depositing nanometer-sized metal particles onto carbon allotropes. The method is scalable and relatively simple, and allows for control over the size and distribution of the metal particles in the substrate, adjusting the surface area to optimize specific thermal or electrical properties of the material. One promising nanocomposite material created consists of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) decorated with metal particles dispersed in a polymer matrix. Ribbons, tubes, and moldings of the nanocomposite were found to have novel intrinsic electrical characteristics that enable tunable dielectric constants with low loss factors. The decoupling and independent control of the two fundamental parameters offer a class of materials with the potential for finely tailored electronic properties. The novel methods enable materials that show promise for a variety of applications in electronics, communications, catalysis, and optics.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials, Product development, Fabrication, Composite materials, Metals, Nanomaterials
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Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

CNTs are manipulated into specific orientations to create small, powerful, and flexible sensors.

NASA Langley Research Center researchers are experts at producing carbon nanotube (CNT)-based sensors for structural health monitoring (SHM). The sensors can be embedded in structures of all geometries to monitor conditions both inside and at the surface of the structure to continuously sense changes. Having accumulated a body of knowledge on how to deposit and align CNTs, NASA is adept at manipulating the CNTs into specific orientations to create small, powerful, and flexible sensors. One of the sensors created by NASA is a highly flexible sensor for crack growth detection and strain field mapping that features a very dense and highly ordered array of single-walled CNTs. NASA is seeking companies that are interested in licensing technology or engaging NASA in joint research in the area of CNT sensors.

Posted in: Briefs, Sensors, On-board diagnostics, On-board diagnostics (OBD), Sensors and actuators, Product development, Fabrication, Nanotechnology
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Melt Infiltration of SiC/SiC Preforms Using Cr-Si Alloys

These composites can be used in aircraft engine turbine blades, vanes, combustor lines, and shrouds.

The goal of this work was to develop engineered matrix SiC/SiC ceramic composites with crack blunting and self-healing capabilities for 1588 to 1755 K applications. The work optimized the temperature and time conditions for melt-infiltrating SiC/SiC preforms with chromium silicide alloys, and established that these alloys do not react with the coatings on the SiC fibers. Traditional ways of fabricating SiC fiber-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) use silicon to melt-infiltrate the CMC preforms, where the Si is often converted to SiC by reaction with carbon. The traditional SiC matrices have poor high-temperature creep properties due to the presence of residual silicon. They also have low fracture toughness and a low matrix cracking stress.

Posted in: Briefs, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Product development, Ceramics, Coatings, colorants, and finishes, Composite materials, Silicon alloys, Smart materials
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Automating Optimization and Design Tasks Across Disciplines

A multidisciplinary design analysis and optimization (MDAO) solution leverages existing analysis codes to streamline optimization tasks early in the design process.

When tackling modern engineering projects, designers must consider not only engineering parameters, but also such key factors as cost, safety, and environmental impact. To exploit the interactions of these various elements, designers must consider them simultaneously. Unfortunately, doing so significantly increases project complexity.

Posted in: Briefs, Software, Design processes, Optimization, Systems engineering, Automation
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Method of Making a Composite Panel Having Subsonic Transverse Wave Speed Characteristics

Applications include internal aircraft structures, buildings, and enclosures for machines.

NASA's Langley Research Center has developed an enhanced design for a composite panel with a recessed core. NASA designed it to decrease the radiation efficiency and increase the transmission loss while maintaining load-bearing capability so it could be used in applications such as aircraft floors. Similar to traditional composite panels, the innovation possesses low weight characteristics, but in addition, it can be used in load-bearing applications. The invention was developed for NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Program. The superior design of the composite panel can be used in a wide variety of commercial applications wherever honeycomb is needed and improved acoustics are desired. NASA has patented and tested the novel design, and is interested in attracting development partners and potential licensees for the recessed core composite panel design.

Posted in: Briefs, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Aircraft structures, Design processes, Flooring, Composite materials
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Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT)

The Federal Aviation Administration's Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT) is a software system that dynamically models aircraft performance in space and time to estimate fuel consumption, emissions, noise, and air quality assessments. Full-flight gate-to-gate analyses are possible for study sizes ranging from a single flight at an airport, to scenarios at the regional, national, and global levels.

Posted in: Briefs, Software, Mathematical models, Computer software and hardware, Environmental testing, Aircraft operations
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Intelligent Software Enables Design of Greener, More Efficient Construction Vehicles

University of Warwick (UK) engineers are optimizing the fuel economy of next-generation offhighway vehicles by introducing new intelligent power systems for improved engine operation. This could lead to significant fuel savings and fewer carbon emissions for the industry. The team is analyzing a current fleet of construction vehicles to better understand the opportunities for emissions reduction and intelligent control.

Posted in: Briefs, Software, Optimization, Fuel economy, Fleet management, Engine control systems, Construction vehicles and equipment
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