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Will solar power supplant fossil fuels as a primary energy source?

This week's Question: The US now has 1 million solar power installations, and some industry experts expect the number of solar-power systems to increase dramatically in the span of two years. “By the end of 2020, the amount of installed solar capacity will be 300 percent higher than today,” said Dan Whitten, vice president of communications at the Solar Energy Industries Association, noting that the nationwide number grew 10 times between 2008 and 2015. This month, the Swedish furniture giant Ikea also recently announced the opening of its “Solar Shop,” which will sell panels and setup services. Two major challenges for the solar panel industry have been cost and capacity; compared to fossil fuel costs, solar panel installations can be time-consuming and expensive. What do you think? Will solar power supplant fossil fuels as a primary energy source? 

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Would you use a “skin to screen” technology?

This week's Question: The SkinTrack technology featured in today’s lead story allows users to expand touchpad functionality to the back of the hand and lower arm. By wearing a ring, users can enable cursor movement, highlight numbers on a screen, or dial numbers on a keypad. What do you think? Would you use a “skin to screen” technology?

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Could tear-off screens catch on?

This week's Question: While LG and Samsung have worked to develop screens that roll and bend, a new patent from Google describes a screen that can be torn like a piece of paper. Images in the filing show an advertisement with coupons that can be pulled off and used in-store, as well as a drawing of a robot that has been ripped in half. Additionally, the detached portions are shown being reattached. Disposable displays will likely not emerge as a viable technology until manufacturing costs drop significantly. Engineers, however, have also been working on ways to make digital pixels appear on regular paper. What do you think? Could tear-off screens catch on? 

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Could a solar-powered airplane be commercially viable?

This week's Question: Solar Impulse 2, a solar-powered airplane, completed a risky, 62-hour flight across a wide expanse of the Pacific Ocean. According to pilot and Swiss engineer Andre Borschberg, the plane now has the ability, in theory, to fly for an unlimited period, with only the human factor limiting how long the plane could potentially stay on the air. What do you think? Could a solar-powered airplane be commercially viable?  

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Will you wear “e-textiles”?

This week's Question: Researchers at The Ohio State University have embroidered circuits into fabric with 0.1-mm precision — an ideal size to integrate electronic components, such as sensors and computer memory devices, into clothing. With the advance, the team has taken the next step toward the design of functional textiles — clothes that gather, store, or transmit digital information. The development could lead to shirts that act as antennas for your smartphone, workout clothes that monitor your fitness level, a bandage that monitors your health, or even a flexible fabric cap that senses brain activity. What do you think? Will you wear “e-textiles”?  

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Will 'smart glasses' catch on?

This week's Question: A recent patent application from the South Korean electronics giant Samsung revealed a new concept for smart contact lenses. The eyewear includes a built-in camera, sensors, and a display that can project images directly into a wearer’s eyes. The smart lenses can be controlled using eye movements and blinking, potentially allowing users to take photos with the miniature camera simply by winking or blinking. According to the 29-page application, however, the image quality of smart glasses is limited, and the technology does not provide a natural interface. What do you think? Will 'smart glasses' catch on?  

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Are cars set to be the next 'ultimate mobile device'?

This week's Question: As companies like Google and Apple lead self-driving car efforts, Hyundai Motors America CEO David Zuchowski expects the bridge between Silicon Valley and auto companies to narrow. In a recent interview with CNBC, Zuchowski suggested cars could replace mobile phones as the next big smart device. The CEO expects alliances to form between automakers — potential "hardware builders" — and technology companies that supply the software. "[Consumers] want an Apple experience," Zuchowski told CNBC. "The car is the ultimate mobile device, right?" What do you think? Are cars set to be the next 'ultimate mobile device'?    

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