Home

New Compounds Developed to Manufacture Tunable OLED Devices

Researchers have developed new organic compounds characterized by higher modularity, stability, and efficiency that could be applicable for use in electronics or lighting. A proof-of-concept project has begun to verify that the compounds have the photoluminescence and electrochemical properties required for the manufacture of tunable organic LEDs (OLEDs) that can emit in the blue portion of the visible spectrum, thus applying lower voltages and achieving greater efficiency and longer life.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Materials, Energy Efficiency, Energy, Lighting, OLEDs, News

Read More >>

NASA's Hot 100 Technologies: Electrical/Electronics

High-Field Superconducting Magnets This technology represents a significant improvement over commercial state-of-the-art magnets. These superconducting magnets are very versatile and can be used in a number of applications requiring magnetic fields at low temperature, such as in MRI machines, mass spectrometers, and particle accelerators.

Posted in: Electronics, Techs for License, Articles

Read More >>

High-Performance Computing Drives A Growing, Evolving Internet of Things

Not too long ago, the idea of bringing intelligence to physical objects in our world and interconnecting them might have seemed like science fiction. Yet it is happening right now, as the phenomenon we call the Internet of Things (IoT) takes shape.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, White Papers

Read More >>

The Self-Driving Car

Since the first demonstration of a radio-controlled car in 1925, the automotive industry has been seeking to build a reliable driverless vehicle. The safety of robot-quick reflexes and predictive algorithms, combined with the convenience of effortless travel, is appealing. For those who cannot physically drive, an autonomous car allows a new level of freedom. Of the 5.5 million car crashes per year in the United States, 93 per- cent of them have a human cause as the primary factor.1 A self-driving car could reduce such accidents and, as a bonus, use its predictive driving to reduce fuel consumption and traffic congestion.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, White Papers

Read More >>

Technique Generates Electricity from Mechanical Vibrations

Research scientists at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland have demonstrated a new technique for generating electrical energy. The method can be used in harvesting energy from mechanical vibrations of the environment and converting it into electricity. Energy harvesters are needed in wireless self-powered sensors and medical implants, where they could ultimately replace batteries. The technology could be introduced on an industrial scale within three to six years.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Power Management, Energy Harvesting, Energy, Semiconductors & ICs, News

Read More >>

NASA Computer Model Reveals Carbon Dioxide Levels

An ultra-high-resolution NASA computer model has given scientists a stunning new look at how carbon dioxide in the atmosphere travels around the globe.Plumes of carbon dioxide in the simulation swirl and shift as winds disperse the greenhouse gas away from its sources. The simulation also illustrates differences in carbon dioxide levels in the northern and southern hemispheres, and distinct swings in global carbon dioxide concentrations as the growth cycle of plants and trees changes with the seasons.Scientists have made ground-based measurements of carbon dioxide for decades and in July NASA launched the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite to make global, space-based carbon observations. But the simulation — the product of a new computer model that is among the highest-resolution ever created — is the first to show in such fine detail how carbon dioxide actually moves through the atmosphere.In addition to providing a striking visual description of the movements of an invisible gas like carbon dioxide, as it is blown by the winds, this kind of high-resolution simulation will help scientists better project future climate. Engineers can also use this model to test new satellite instrument concepts to gauge their usefulness. The model allows engineers to build and operate a “virtual” instrument inside a computer.SourceAlso: Learn about the NASA Data Acquisition System (NDAS).

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Environmental Monitoring, Green Design & Manufacturing, Greenhouse Gases, Software, Test & Measurement, Measuring Instruments, Aerospace, News

Read More >>

Moving Cameras Track Objects Automatically

University of Washington electrical engineers have developed a way to automatically track people across moving and still cameras by using an algorithm that trains the networked cameras to learn one another’s differences. The cameras first identify a person in a video frame, then follow that same person across multiple camera views.“Tracking humans automatically across cameras in a three-dimensional space is new,” said lead researcher Jenq-Neng Hwang, a UW professor of electrical engineering. “As the cameras talk to each other, we are able to describe the real world in a more dynamic sense.”Imagine a typical GPS display that maps the streets, buildings and signs in a neighborhood as your car moves forward, then add humans to the picture. With the new technology, a car with a mounted camera could take video of the scene, then identify and track humans and overlay them into the virtual 3-D map on your GPS screen. The UW researchers are developing this to work in real time, which could help pick out people crossing in busy intersections, or track a specific person who is dodging the police.“Our idea is to enable the dynamic visualization of the realistic situation of humans walking on the road and sidewalks, so eventually people can see the animated version of the real-time dynamics of city streets on a platform like Google Earth,” Hwang said.SourceAlso: Learn about Machine Vision for High-Precision Volume Measurement.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Cameras, Video, Visualization Software, Imaging, News

Read More >>