Home

Starting Point for Overcoming Barrier to Fusion Power

The accuracy of a new model for predicting the size of a key barrier to fusion power, which was developed by physicist Robert Goldston of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), has been confirmed. Goldston’s model predicts the width of what physicists call the “scrape-off layer” in tokamaks, the most widely used fusion facilities.

Posted in: Power Management, Energy, News

Read More >>

The Future of Iron-Air Batteries

A University of Southern California research team has developed a cheap, rechargeable battery that could be used to store energy at solar power plants for a rainy day. The air-breathing battery uses the chemical energy generated by the oxidation of iron plates that are exposed to the oxygen in the air — a process similar to rusting.

Posted in: Batteries, Energy Storage, Solar Power, Energy Efficiency, News

Read More >>

New Tech for Grid-Level Electrical Energy Storage

Electrical energy storage is the obstacle preventing more widespread use of renewable energy sources. Due to the unpredictable nature of wind and solar energy, the ability to store this energy when it is produced is essential for turning these resources into reliable sources of energy. The current U.S. energy grid system is used predominantly for distributing energy and allows little flexibility for storage of excess or a rapid dispersal on short notice. Drexel University researchers believe they have a solution.

Posted in: Batteries, Energy Storage, Solar Power, Wind Power, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Energy, News

Read More >>

Ultra-Sensitive Biosensor for Medical Diagnostics

This device may enable miniaturization and new point-of-care applications in doctors' offices. Researchers have created an ultrasensitive biosensor that could open up new opportunities for early detection of cancer and “personalized medicine” tailored to the specific biochemistry of individual patients. The device, which could be several hundred times more sensitive than other biosensors, combines the attributes of two distinctly different types of sensors, said Muhammad A. Alam, a Purdue Uni versity professor of electrical and computer engineering.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Electronic Components, Sensors, Medical, Diagnostics, Briefs, MDB

Read More >>

Carbon Nanotubes Help Energize Fuel Cells and Metal-Air Batteries

Fuel cells, which use chemicals to create electricity, hold promise in a variety of areas but the high price of platinum catalysts used inside the cells has provided a roadblock. One promising low-cost alternative to platinum is the carbon nanotube – an excellent conductor of electricity. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes riddled with defects and impurities on the outside could eventually replace some of the platinum catalysts used in fuel cells and metal-air batteries, according to Stanford University scientists.

Posted in: Batteries, Alternative Fuels, Energy Storage, News

Read More >>

A Better Understanding of High-Temperature Superconductors

Superconductivity, in which electric current flows without resistance, promises huge energy savings – from low-voltage electric grids with no transmission losses, super-efficient motors and generators, and myriad other schemes. But such everyday applications still lie in the future, because conventional superconductivity in metals can’t do the job.

Posted in: Power Management, Lasers & Laser Systems, Energy Storage, Energy, News

Read More >>

Organic Photovoltaics - Forecasts for the Next Decade

Today there are multiple devices available for harnessing solar energy. Each device offers a different set of characteristics. Wafer-based devices consist of mono or polycrystalline and are the most mature technology due to the experience borrowed from the microelectronics industry.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Solar Power, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Energy Harvesting, Automotive, Articles, Features

Read More >>