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Product of the Month: March 2017

Watlow, St. Louis, MO, introduced the D4T with INTUITION® data logger with a range of field-removable I/O modules. The data logger features a 4.3” color graphical touch panel with a high-resolution graphical user interface that allows channels, alarms, inputs, and outputs to be customized with user-defined names. The unit is programmable to show information in multiple languages, and enables users to choose encrypted, .CSV, or both types of file formats for tamperproof record needs. Users can select which parameters to log, from one to 128 points simultaneously, and where to store files — inside the controller, on a connected USB memory device, or to a connected PC anywhere in the world. The system records as fast as one time per 0.1 second, or as slow as one time per hour. The system is available with 1 to 24 channels, and is compatible with temperature, altitude, humidity, AC current, and other 0-10VDC or 0-20 mA process units. It connects with a controller via Ethernet, and offers communications options including Ethernet Modbus® TCP and SCPI, and EIA-232/485 Modbus® RTU.

Posted in: Products, Electronics & Computers

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MRAM Alternative Uses Less Energy than Conventional Chip

Purely electrical memory chips commonly used today are volatile and their state must be continuously refreshed, which requires a lot of energy. An alternative to these electrical memory chips is magnetic random access memory (MRAM), which saves data magnetically and does not require constant refreshing. They do, however, require relatively large electrical currents to write the data to memory, which reduces reliability.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Computer software and hardware, Integrated circuits, Energy consumption

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Reconfigurable Chaos-Based Microchips

Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed nonlinear chaos-based integrated circuits that enable computer chips to perform multiple functions with fewer transistors. These integrated circuits can be manufactured with off-the-shelf fabrication processes, and could lead to novel computer architectures that do more with less circuitry and fewer transistors.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Architecture, Integrated circuits, Transistors, Fabrication

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Supercomputer Cooling System Uses Refrigerant to Replace Water

Sandia National Laboratories researchers designed a cooling system for supercomputer centers that is expected to save four to five million gallons of water annually in New Mexico if installed at Sandia's computing center, and hundreds of millions of gallons nationally if the method is widely adopted. It is being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), which expects to save a million gallons annually. The system, built by Johnson Controls and called the Thermosyphon Cooler Hybrid System, cools like a refrigerator without the expense and energy needs of a compressor.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Computer software and hardware, Product development, Cooling, Refrigerants

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Computer Chips Calculate and Store in an Integrated Unit

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison created computer chips that can be configured to perform complex calculations and store massive amounts of information within the same integrated unit, and communicate efficiently with other chips. Called “liquid silicon” — liquid for software and silicon for hardware — the technology has uses in data-intensive applications such as facial or voice recognition, natural language processing, and graph analytics.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Integrated circuits, Product development

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Printed Circuit Board Design Software Helps Create New Energy Solutions

Founded in 2006, Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT) delivers high-quality pulsed power solutions to organizations such as the Department of Energy (DoE), NASA, and the United States Navy. From its headquarters in Seattle, WA, EHT offers a full suite of pulsed power products to commercial and research markets. These organizations depend on high-voltage nanosecond pulse generation, advanced plasma sources, and fusion energy technologies.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Integrated circuits, Electric power, Supplier assessment

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Electron-to-Photon Communication for Quantum Computing

Princeton University researchers have built a device in which a single electron can pass its quantum information to a particle of light. The particle of light, or photon, then acts as a messenger to carry the information to other electrons, creating connections that form the circuits of a quantum computer.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Architecture, Communication protocols, Computer software and hardware, Product development

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