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Film/Adhesive Processing Module for Fiber-Placement Processing of Composites

Films, foils, or adhesives may be interleaved while fiber-placing composite material structures. An automated apparatus has been designed and constructed that enables the automated lay-up of composite structures incorporating films, foils, and adhesives during the automated fiberplacement process. This apparatus, denoted a film module, could be used to deposit materials in film or thin sheet form either simultaneously when laying down the fiber composite article or in an independent step. Examples of materials that may be processed with this device include structural core and joining adhesives, permeation barrier films/foils, surfacing films, lightning-strike materials and IVHM (Integral Vehicle Health Monitoring) arrays. The use of this technology will reduce composite fabrication time and will allow for new concepts/ designs to be considered for fiber-placed composite structures.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs

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Automated Solvent Seaming of Large Polyimide Membranes

Success depends on precise control of all relevant process details. A solvent-based welding process enables the joining of precise, cast polyimide membranes at their edges to form larger precise membranes. The process creates a homogeneous, optical - quality seam between abutting membranes, with no overlap and with only a very localized area of figure disturbance. The seam retains 90 percent of the strength of the parent material. The process was developed for original use in the fabrication of wide - aperture membrane optics, with areal densities densities of less than 1 kg/m2, for lightweight telescopes, solar concentrators, antennas, and the like to be deployed in outer space. The process is just as well applicable to the fabrication of large precise polyimide membranes for flat or inflatable solar concentrators and antenna reflectors for terrestrial applications.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs

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Manufacturing Precise, Lightweight Paraboloidal Mirrors

Success depends on the proper selection of materials and process conditions. A process for fabricating a precise, diffraction- limited, ultralightweight, composite-material (matrix/fiber) paraboloidal telescope mirror has been devised. Unlike the traditional process of fabrication of heavier glass-based mirrors, this process involves a minimum of manual steps and subjective judgment. Instead, this process involves objectively controllable, repeatable steps; hence, this process is better suited for mass production.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs, TSP

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Heat Treatment of Friction-Stir-Welded 7050 Aluminum Plates

Strength, ductility, and resistance to stress corrosion cracking are increased. A method of heat treatment has been developed to reverse some of the deleterious effects of friction stir welding of plates of aluminum alloy 7050. This alloy is considered unweldable by arc and high-energy-density beam fusion welding processes. The alloy can be friction stir welded, but as-welded workpieces exhibit low ductility, low tensile and yield strengths, and low resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Heat treatment according to the present method increases tensile and yield strengths, and minimizes or eliminates stress corrosion cracking. It also increases ductility.

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Attaching Thermocouples by Peening or Crimping

These techniques are simple, effective, and minimally invasive. Two simple, effective techniques for attaching thermocouples to metal substrates have been devised for high- temperature applications in which attachment by such conventional means as welding, screws, epoxy, or tape would not be effective. The techniques have been used successfully to attach 0.005-in. (0.127-mm)-diameter type-S thermocouples to substrates of niobium alloy C-103 and stainless steel 416 for measuring temperatures up to 2,600 °F (1,427 °C). The techniques are equally applicable to other thermocouple and substrate materials.

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Submarine Design Certified on FEA and Sensor Testing

The American Bureau of Shipping certified a submarine solely on the basis of finite element analysis (FEA) and strain sensor testing. Submarine design typically follows American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) code, which establishes properties such as hull thickness, frame stiffness, and porthole and hatch design. During certification, ABS evaluates whether a design follows the relevant codes and then certifies it or not on that basis. The design of a deep-diving submarine was so unique that some ABS rules could not be adhered to.

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Simplified Fabrication of Helical Copper Antennas

From concept to working prototype takes just a few hours. A simplified technique has been devised for fabricating helical antennas for use in experiments on radio-frequency generation and acceleration of plasmas. These antennas are typically made of copper (for electrical conductivity) and must have a specific helical shape and precise diameter.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs, TSP

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