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The Benefits of 3D Printing for Medical Implant and Prostheses Development

3D printing is one of the world’s fastest growing technologies, and is already revolutionizing the many areas of medical manufacturing in ways similar to how computers revolutionized communication. Using the right input, medical files such as 2D imaging (MRI or CT scans) can be used to create customized anatomical models, medical devices, and prosthetics. Manufacturing parts in this way reduces time and cost by as much as 80-90%. In this white paper from Stratasys, find out how medical professionals are actively exploring the vast possibilities that 3D printing offers.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers

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Increased Alignment in Carbon Nanotube Growth

Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California The combination of electronic and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to wide-ranging investigation of their potential in future electronics and computing, sensors, electrodes, and composites. A method and system for fabricating an array of two or more CNT structures on a coated substrate surface was developed.

Posted in: Briefs

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Process to Fabricate Specific Sized Monodisperse Polystyrene Microparticles

Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia A new method was developed to prepare monodisperse nano to microparticles of polystyrene ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 microns in relatively large-quantity batches (2 L, 10% by weight in water). Current commercial sources are very expensive and can typically only be acquired on a relatively small scale. Monodisperse polystyrene in this size range is an important component of laser velocimetry measurements in wind tunnels, but has many other potential uses. Polystyrene microparticles have uses in paints/coatings, adhesives, bio/immunoassays, reaction catalysts, and chromatography materials. The main benefits of this technology are low cost, scalability, and selectable size.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Based Fabrication of Printable Electronics and Functional Coatings

Applications include biomedical, consumer electronics, security, and communications industries. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California The need for low-cost and environmentally friendly processes for fabricating printable electronics and biosensor chips is growing. Nanomaterials have proved to be very useful in both printable electronics due to their electronic properties, and in biosensors for signal transduction, and amplification. Chemical vapor deposition requires high temperatures for the growth of nanostructures, restricting the type and nature of materials that can be used as substrates. Conventional plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition requires high vacuum equipment, and the need for vacuum results in additional costs of vacuum pumps and energy resources.

Posted in: Briefs

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Passive Destructive Interference Acoustic Liner for a Turbofan Engine Using Additive Manufacturing

John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio This technology exploits the capabilities of additive manufacturing to attenuate the fan noise within the inlet or aft duct of a turbofan engine. The approach may be expanded to include auxiliary power units, environmental control systems, or other cooling systems requiring noise attenuation.

Posted in: Briefs

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Products of Tomorrow: May 2015

The technologies NASA develops don’t just blast off into space. They also improve our lives here on Earth. Life-saving search-and-rescue tools, implantable medical devices, advances in commercial aircraft safety, increased accuracy in weather forecasting, and the miniature cameras in our cellphones are just some of the examples of NASA-developed technology used in products today.

Posted in: Articles, Products

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Industry Roundtable: 3D Printing

It seems that every day, designers and engineers are finding exciting new applications for 3D printing, from creating custom prostheses to making tools used for repairs on the International Space Station. 3D printing is considered a revolutionary technology that can transform our lives. But what are the real benefits — and the real consequences — of such a drastic change in manufacturing?

Posted in: Articles

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