Home

Integrally Woven Fiber Architecture for Composite Turbine Blades

John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio Composite turbine blades are currently fabricated by laying up multiple layers of fibers in the form of either unidirectional prepregs or thin woven cloth. Composites formed in this manner have poor through-thickness strength. It is also difficult, if not impossible, to form trailing edges as thin as necessary for optimum engine performance.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs, TSP

Read More >>

Assembly and Packaging to Mass-Produce Carbon Nanotube Vacuum Microdevices and Circuits

An assembly process allows mixing and matching of different types of electrode and dielectric layers assembled in a stack to create multi-electrode vacuum devices. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Field-emission electron sources using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being targeted for low-power vacuum microelectronic applications for harsh-environment operation (high temperature, pressure, and corrosive atmosphere). While CNTs have demonstrated excellent properties in terms of low threshold field, low-power operation, and high-current densities, one of the problems that has persisted for vacuum electronic applications is the low yield of multi-electrode vacuum devices such as diodes, triodes, tetrodes, pentodes, etc.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs, TSP

Read More >>

Full-Cell Evaluation/Screening Technique for New Battery Chemistries

A full-cell configuration with a limited electrolyte in the cell is used to reflect the actual cell build conditions. John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio A quick and cost-effective evaluation/screening technique for new battery chemistries was developed that integrates the individual advanced cell component in a full-cell format to identify the critical issues, such as cell component interaction and compatibility before proceeding to commercial production. To make the assessment more practical, a unique way of introducing limited electrolyte was developed. This technique enabled fast and low-cost screening to address any potential issues.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs, TSP

Read More >>

Solar Panel and System Design to Reduce Heating and Optimize Corridors for Lower-Risk Planetary Aerobraking

New approach features aggressive load reduction to reduce risk. Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland This innovation presents a spacecraft aerobraking approach that reduces heating and optimizes corridors, which reduces overall risk. This is accomplished by combining solar panel aspect ratio and edge features with simple spacecraft packaging optimization and integrated thermal-analysis techniques that also allow specifying a more benign temperature corridor.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs, TSP

Read More >>

Novel Chemistry for Deposition of MgF2 Thin Films

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Magnesium fluoride (MgF2) thin films are useful for many different optics applications. In particular, they are useful for ultraviolet anti-reflective and protective coatings. However, in the far UV, one needs a very small, controllable amount of material to get the best optical performance. That is difficult to achieve with conventional methods. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is an ideal UV-compatible thin-film deposition technique due to its ability to deposit uniform, pin-hole free films with angstrom-level thickness control. Therefore, it is an ideal technique to use to deposit protective thin films in the 2-nm thickness range. However, conventional ALD-MgF2 reactions are very unpredictable due to the low reactivity and volatility of the precursors.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs, TSP

Read More >>

Self-Aligning Lug for Adapting Carbon Fiber Rods to a Bolted Metallic Connection

Joint strength is controlled through precise bond line control. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California The enormous strength of unidirectional carbon fiber composite rods is difficult to take advantage of at their ends because of inadequate joining technology. Bolting does not work with unidirectional composites, and bonding is difficult due to stiffness mismatches between the metallic and composite connections. Ideally, a thick bond is desired so that the relatively softer adhesive can shear and distribute shear stresses instead of peaking at the ends of the bond. Thick bonds are difficult to obtain and repeatedly control with conventional methods of beads, bonding wire, shim, or tooling. Most of these methods control the minimum thickness of the bond, but do not control the maximum thickness. In addition, traditional joint types such as lap, strap, and scarf are not ideal for this application.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs, TSP

Read More >>

Growth Method for Chalcongenide Phase-Change Nanostructures

Nanometer-scale materials can provide smaller devices than those currently available. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California Recently, one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures such as nanowires and nanotubes have become the focal point of research in nanotechnology due to their fascinating properties. These properties are intrinsically associated with low dimensionality and small diameters, which may lead to unique applications in various nanoscale devices. It is generally accepted that 1-D nanostructures provide an excellent test ground for understanding the dependence of physical, electrical, thermal, optical, and mechanical properties on material dimensionality and physical size. In particular, 1-D semiconductor nanostructures, which exhibit different properties as compared with their bulk or thin film counterparts, have shown great potential in future nanoelectronics applications in data storage, computing, and sensing devices.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs, TSP

Read More >>