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White, Electrically Conductive, Radiation-Stable, Thermal Control Coating

Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland A highly reflective, white conductive coating system was developed using a layered approach with a combination of commercially available white conductive pigments within a conductive binder system. The top coating is a space-stable, radiation-resistant, highly reflective coating that has been tailored to provide optimum reflectance properties and meet vacuum thermal surface resistivities. The combined layer is a mixture of a highly reflective, electrically dissipative coating and a moderately reflective but highly conductive pigment in a conductive binder. A second, underlying layer of conductive white coating offers optimum adhesion to metal substrates and the topcoat. The system vacuum resistivity at room temperature is approximately 1 × 109 ohms/sq, and has a solar absorptance of less than 0.13 as measured on a Cary 5000 spectrophotometer.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Thermoelectrics, Coatings & Adhesives

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Plasma-Assisted Thin Film Coatings to Create Highly Hydrophobic Porous Structures

Multiple samples can be coated in this manner. John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio Gas-distribution layers (GDLs) are water-management structures used in fuel cells and electrolyzers. GDLs are critical components that prevent flooding of the fuel cell electrode by product water, thus preserving open channels for reactant gas to reach the electrode. Typically, GDLs are electrically conductive papers (metal or carbon) having a fine pore structure. Extremely fine pores in some GDL materials are difficult to fully infiltrate with Teflon (PTFE). These materials are typically wet-proofed by coating with hydrophobic materials (e.g. PTFE). This is usually accomplished by immersing the raw paper in a PTFE emulsion. Completeness of wet-proofing by immersion in emulsion can be limited, because fine pores will filter out the PTFE particles.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Coatings & Adhesives

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Watching Alloys Change Could Lead to Better Metals

If you put a camera in the ice machine and watched water turn into ice, the process would look simple. But the mechanism behind liquids turning to solids is actually quite complex, and understanding it better could improve design and production of metals. A recent investigation aboard the International Space Station (ISS) involved experiments using transparent alloys to observe microstructures that form at the point the material solidifies.

Posted in: UpFront

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Coming Soon - Solving the Challenges of Grounding and Bonding Composite Airframes

Weight-saving composite airframes create new challenges in providing reliable grounding and bonding systems.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars, Composites

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BioCompatic: LEMO - Northwire's Robust USP Class VI Silicone Alternative

Combining decades of field-proven life science experience, LEMO and Northwire’s collaborative white paper highlights the professional expertise and continual innovation necessary to design and manufacture end-to-end (E2E) connector and cable assembly solutions that meet the rapidly evolving demands of the medical market.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Coatings & Adhesives

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Optical Fiber for Solar Cells

These materials enable new solar-powered devices that are small, lightweight, and can be used without connection to existing electrical grids. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California Polymeric and inorganic semiconductors offer relatively high quantum efficiencies, and are much less expensive and versatile to fabricate than non-amorphous silicon wafers. An optical fiber and cladding can be designed and fabricated to confine light for transport within ultraviolet and near-infrared media, using evanescent waves, and to transmit visible wavelength light for direct lighting.

Posted in: Briefs, Energy Storage, Solar Power, Fiber Optics

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Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California A new technology to create electrochemical double-layer supercapacitors is provided using carbon nanotubes as electrodes of the storage medium. This invention allows efficient transport between the capacitor electrodes through the porous nature of the nanotubes, and has a low interface resistance between the electrode material and the collector. Carbon nanotubes directly grown on a metal surface are used to improve the supercapacitor performance. The nanotubes offer a high surface area and usable porosity for a given volume and mass, both of which are highly desirable for supercapacitor operation.

Posted in: Briefs, Energy Storage

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