Home

Photo-Chemical Machining (PCM) of metals…faster & more cost effective than you’d think!

Photo-Chemical Machining (PCM) or photo-etching of metals is a mature process used to create very accurate metal components. This process emerged in the 1960s as an offshoot of the printed circuit board industry. PCM can produce highly complex parts with very fine details, quickly, accurately and economically. Photo etching is a cost effective alternative to stamping, punching, laser cutting, water jet cutting, or electrical discharge machining (EDM) of thin gauge precision parts.

Posted in: Webinars, On-Demand Webinars, Metals

Read More >>

Microcapsule Method Captures Carbon

Researchers has developed a novel class of materials that enable a safer, cheaper, and more energy-efficient process for removing greenhouse gas from power-plant emissions. The team, led by scientists from Harvard University and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, employed a microfluidic assembly technique to produce microcapsules that contain liquid sorbents, or absorbing materials, encased in highly permeable polymer shells. The capsules have significant performance advantages over the carbon-absorbing materials used in current capture and sequestration technology.The new technique employs an abundant and environmentally benign sorbent: sodium carbonate, which is kitchen-grade baking soda. The microencapsulated carbon sorbents (MECS) achieve an order-of-magnitude increase in CO2 absorption rates compared to sorbents currently used in carbon capture. The carbon sorbents are produced using a double-capillary device in which the flow rates of three fluids — a carbonate solution combined with a catalyst for enhanced CO2 absorption, a photo-curable silicone that forms the capsule shell, and an aqueous solution — can be independently controlled.The MECS-based approach could also be tailored to industrial processes like steel and cement production, which are significant greenhouse gas sources.SourceRead other Materials tech briefs.

Posted in: News, Greenhouse Gases, Remediation Technologies

Read More >>

Modeling Transmission Effects on Multilayer Insulation

New mathematical modeling of multilayer insulation performance extends over a much wider range of performance criteria than other known models. John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida Recent experimental results within the NASA community have shown apparent degradation in the performance of multilayer insulation (MLI) when used in low-temperature applications, e.g., in liquid hydrogen tanks. There was speculation that this degradation was due to the appearance of radiative transmission of energy at these low temperatures since the black-body emission curve at low temperatures corresponds to long wavelengths that might be able to partially pass through the MLI sheets. The standard models for MLI could not be extended to include transmission effects, so a new mathematical system was developed that generalizes the description of the performance of this insulation material.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Coatings & Adhesives

Read More >>

Woven Thermal Protection System

Woven thermal protection system (WTPS) is a new approach to producing TPS materials that uses precisely engineered 3D weaving techniques to customize material characteristics needed to meet specific missions requirements for protecting space vehicles from the intense heating generated during atmospheric entry. Using WTPS, sustainable, scalable, mission-optimized TPS solutions can be achieved with relatively low lifecycle costs compared with the high costs and long development schedules currently associated with material development and certification. WTPS leverages the mature weaving technology that has evolved from the textile industry to design TPS materials with tailorable performance by varying material composition and properties via the controlled placement of fibers within a woven structure. The resulting material can be designed to perform optimally for a wide range of entry conditions.

Posted in: Briefs

Read More >>

Innovative, Low-CTE, Lightweight Structures with Higher Strength

These composites feature controllable properties and strength. Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland A series of lightweight (density below 2.0 gm/cm3) composites has been manufactured that have controllable properties. The core composite has been improved to provide higher strength (similar to aluminum), extremely low density, receptivity to exterior coatings, and highly designable properties. The composite is made in days, is machinable and formable, can be joined/threaded, can be exposed to various environments (temperature, radiation), and is easily made into many parts. Lightweight mirrors for space and IR applications are extremely important. The goal of this work was to create lightweight multifunctional composites for replacement of titanium, beryllium, Invar, aluminum, rubber, and graphite epoxy for structural, mirror, and non-structural components. The key characteristics of this tailorable composite are low density, high stiffness (up to 25 MSI modulus), variable/low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) (2 to 7 ppm/°C), high temperature refractory materials and variable thermal conductivity. The composites are easily made (time to completion of 7 to 10 days), joinable, threadable, machinable to 80 mils, durable to resist FOD (foreign object damage), ductile enough to behave like a metal, and relatively low in cost.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Coatings & Adhesives, Composites

Read More >>

Negative Dielectric Constant Material Based on Ion-Conducting Materials

Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia Metamaterials, or artificial negative index materials (NIMs), have generated great attention due to their unique and exotic electromagnetic properties. A negative dielectric constant material, which is an essential key for creating the NIMs, was developed by doping ions into a polymer, a protonated poly(benzimidazole) (PBI).

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Energy Storage, Sensors

Read More >>

Insulating Materials and Precursor Formulations, and Method of Forming

Methods were developed for forming an insulating material that combines a polysilazane, a cross-linking compound, and a gas-generating compound to form a reaction mixture, and curing the reaction mixture to form a modified polysilazane. The gas-generating compound may be water, an alcohol, an amine, or a matrix comprising one of a reaction product of a polysilazane and an isocyanate, and a reaction product of a polysilazane and an epoxy resin. The matrix also comprises a plurality of interconnected pores produced from a reaction of the polysilazane and the epoxy resin.

Posted in: Briefs

Read More >>