Foldable Material Can Support Many Times its Weight

Researchers at Drexel University and Dalian University of Technology in China have chemically engineered a new, electrically conductive nanomaterial that is flexible enough to fold, but strong enough to support many times its own weight. They believe it can be used to improve electrical energy storage, water filtration, and radio frequency shielding in technology from portable electronics to coaxial cables.

Posted in: News, Energy Storage


Researchers Develop a Way to Control Material with Voltage

A new way of switching the magnetic properties of a material using just a small applied voltage, developed by researchers at MIT and collaborators elsewhere, could signal the beginning of a new family of materials with a variety of switchable properties. The technique could ultimately be used to control properties other than magnetism, including reflectivity or thermal conductivity. The first application of the new finding is likely to be a new kind of memory chip that requires no power to maintain data once it’s written, drastically lowering its overall power needs. This could be especially useful for mobile devices, where battery life is often a major limitation.

Posted in: News, Batteries, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Power Management, Metals


Garnet Ceramics Could Be the Key to High-Energy Lithium Batteries

Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have discovered exceptional properties in a garnet material that could enable development of higher-energy battery designs. The ORNL-led team used scanning transmission electron microscopy to take an atomic-level look at a cubic garnet material called LLZO. The researchers found the material to be highly stable in a range of aqueous environments, making the compound a promising component in new battery configurations.

Posted in: News, Batteries, Electronic Components, Power Management, Energy Efficiency, Ceramics


Sensor Uses Radio Waves to Detect Subtle Pressure Changes

Stanford engineers have invented a wireless pressure sensor that has already been used to measure brain pressure in lab mice with brain injuries. The underlying technology has such broad potential that it could one day be used to create skin-like materials that can sense pressure, leading to prosthetic devices with the electronic equivalent of a sense of touch. In one simple demonstration they used this wireless pressure sensor to read a team member’s pulse without touching him.

Posted in: News, Metals, Plastics, Antennas, Detectors, Sensors


New Coating Cools Buildings, Beams Away Heat

Stanford engineers have invented a revolutionary coating material that can help cool buildings, even on sunny days, by radiating heat away from the buildings and sending it directly into space.

Posted in: News, Energy Efficiency, Coatings & Adhesives


New Compounds Developed to Manufacture Tunable OLED Devices

Researchers have developed new organic compounds characterized by higher modularity, stability, and efficiency that could be applicable for use in electronics or lighting. A proof-of-concept project has begun to verify that the compounds have the photoluminescence and electrochemical properties required for the manufacture of tunable organic LEDs (OLEDs) that can emit in the blue portion of the visible spectrum, thus applying lower voltages and achieving greater efficiency and longer life.

Posted in: News, Energy Efficiency, OLEDs


NASA's Hot 100 Technologies: Materials & Coatings

Shape Memory Alloys Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs) can be deformed at low temperature and recover their original shape upon heating. New alloys can operate up to ~300 °C, compared to ~80 °C for commercially available alloys. SMAs can be used in adaptive structures, actuators, heat detection devices, medical devices, high-temperature automotive components, aeronautics, and military.

Posted in: Articles, Techs for License, Coatings & Adhesives