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Wire Springs versus Machined Springs: A Comparison

The first question generally asked about Machined Springs is how they compare with Wire Wound Springs. Commencing with this question, this review of Machined Springs will proceed. Wire Springs appeared early in the Industrial Revolution. They established their value immediately, and have not wavered from that most useful course. Certainly, enhancements in materials and manufacturing have been forthcoming, but the basic concept has not changed much. Spring wire coiled hot or cold with ends configured within the limits of coil wire has proven to be a very cost effective, industrial tool that exhibits elasticity within the bounds of known, engineering understanding. Uses range from deep ocean applications to man's reach into the universe. Finding a modern day device large or small, that does not benefit from elasticity, and particularly that provided by Wire Wound Springs, is a rare find.

Posted in: White Papers

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Piezo Engineering Tutorial

1.0 The Direct and Inverse Piezoelectric Effect In 1880, while performing experiments with tourmaline, quartz, topaz, cane sugar and Rochelle salt crystals, Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered that when mechanical stress was applied to a crystal, faint electric charges developed on the surface of that crystal. The prefix “piezo” comes from the Greek piezein, which means to squeeze or press. As a result, piezoelectricity is electrical charge that is produced on certain materials when that material is subjected to an applied mechanical stress or pressure. This is known as the direct piezoelectric effect.

Posted in: White Papers

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Reliable Linear Motion For Packaging Machines

In the productivity-driven packaging industry, there are many possible sources of downtime. You can eliminate many of them by selecting failure-resistant linear motion components.

Posted in: White Papers

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Why bigger isn’t always better: the case for thin section bearings

For applications that demand maximum performance despite space and/or weight restrictions, designers should consider thin section bearings. While conventional bearings often have more load capacity, thin section bearings have more than enough for a wide range of applications and offer exceptional design flexibility with opportunities for significant reductions in overall system size and cost. A new white paper from Kaydon Bearings, an SKF Group company, examines thin section bearing styles and features, with a discussion of design considerations, fit, lubrication, and other useful information.

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NASA Tests Revolutionary Shape-Changing Aircraft Flap

NASA's green aviation project is one step closer to developing technology that could make future airliners quieter and more fuel‑efficient with the successful flight test of a wing surface that can change shape in flight. Researchers replaced an airplane’s conventional aluminum flaps with advanced, shape‑changing assemblies that form seamless bendable and twistable surfaces. Flight testing will determine whether flexible trailing‑edge wing flaps are a viable approach to improve aerodynamic efficiency and reduce noise generated during takeoffs and landings.

Posted in: News, Aviation

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Titan Lake and Shore Sampler

The device is suitable for cryogenic dispensing of fluids, and for cryocoolers. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California A lake and shore sampling and sample distribution system was developed for a Titan lake environment (93.7 K, in liquid hydrocarbons). The Titan Lake and Shore Sampler (TLASS) would enable the chemical analysis of hydrocarbon lake samples via a Dual Rectilinear Ion and Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectrometry.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Electronics & Computers, Data Acquisition

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Hydraulic High-Pressure Valve Controller Using the In Situ Pressure Difference

This technology is applicable to any system or device requiring high-pressure-differential valves. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Various applications exist where high-pressure valves are required, but the problem for control of such valves lies in that they have to move against a strong pressure differential that may require significant force, energy, and large actuators. The solution to this problem is to take advantage of the in situ pressure differential to operate valves by opening small valves to change the pressure on either chamber of a hydraulic cylinder that is connected to the valve’s moving element.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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