The Basics Of Pressure Regulators

Pressure regulators are found in many common home and industrial applications. For example, pressure regulators are used in gas grills to regulate propane pressure, in home furnaces to regulate natural gas, in medical/dental equipment regulate oxygen and anesthesia gases, in pneumatic automation systems to regulate compressed air, in engines to regulate fuel pressure, and in fuel cells to regulate hydrogen. Although the applications vary considerably, the pressure regulators provide the same function. Pressure regulators reduce a supply pressure to a lower outlet pressure and they maintain this outlet pressure regardless of inlet pressure fluctuations. This reduction in pressure is the key characteristic of pressure regulators; outlet pressure is always at a pressure below the inlet pressure.

Posted in: Mechanical Components, White Papers, Briefs

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Advanced Symbolic and Numeric Techniques for Machine Vibration Analysis

The operational reliability of a rotary equipment train is dependent on the vibration of its components. Often, the only evidence of this vibration is gear noise or coupling wear. However, these early indicators might eventually develop into high-amplitude vibration, resulting in gear wear, gear tooth failures, or broken shafts. The torsional response characteristics of rotating and reciprocating equipment should therefore be analyzed and evaluated to ensure system reliability.

Posted in: Mechanical Components, White Papers

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Simplify designs with 4-point contact ball bearings

Four-point contact ball bearings can handle radial, thrust and moment loads simultaneously, saving space, weight and cost by eliminating the need for a second bearing. They are generally used for slow to moderate-speed applications, or where oscillatory movement is sufficient to cause the balls to make one or more revolutions. A new white paper from Kaydon Bearings explains how four-point contact bearings work, their advantages, and design considerations when using them.

Posted in: Mechanical Components, White Papers

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Unique Method for Orifice Production

To produce accurate, repeatable orifices, all the variables that might influence the Cd Value (Coefficient of Discharge) must be controlled during production. This includes the orifice hole length, edges, surface finishes, roundness and the elimination of all tool marks, burrs, ragged edges and irregularities. If any one of these areas is not perfectly managed, the orifice flow rates will vary from piece to piece thereby making it impossible to predict flow with any accuracy.

Posted in: Mechanics, Mechanical Components, White Papers

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How to Optimize Performance and Minimize Size in High Speed Applications

Electric motors are continuously evolving with the constant release of new material in the market. Today, NeoFe magnets are reaching 50 MGoe and new lamination materials offering limited losses, allow the use of electric motors at very high speed. For each application it’s crucial to understand in detail the specifications in order to offer the optimum design, Portescap has developed few motor technologies in order to be address each application with an optimal solution.

Posted in: Mechanics, Mechanical Components, White Papers

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Spherical Plain Bearing

AST Bearings’ website features a variety of white papers covering a range of spherical plain bearings, free of charge. These white papers include spherical plain bearings requiring lubrication (steel-on-steel) and maintenance-free spherical plain bearings, which are broken down into categories according to the sliding contact surfaces: steel-on-PTFE composite material, steel-on- PTFE fabric and steel-on-copper alloy. The white papers offer valuable and detailed information, such as design characteristics, materials, applications, temperatures and more for every product.

Posted in: Mechanical Components, White Papers

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Lubricant Selection: What Every Design Engineer Needs to Know

Simply stated, lubrication refers to the age-old science of friction reduction. People have been using lubricants for thousands of years, experimenting with waxes and oils from vegetables, fish, and animals to move heavy materials with equipment designed to gain mechanical advantage. In more recent years, the discovery of petroleum oil in the 1800s ushered in a new era of lubrication developments as people learned how to refine this oil and use it for a variety of purposes. Machinery could now be developed to operate faster and under heavier loads by using lubricants to create a barrier that eliminates friction and metalon- metal contact.

Posted in: Materials, Mechanical Components, Machinery & Automation, White Papers

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