100 Percent Solids: Superior Adhesive Technology for the Medical Industry

Adhesives using 100 percent solids coating act fast, without need for solvents. In the medical industry, adhesives play a crucial role in applications ranging from diagnostics and device assembly to transdermal and wound care. There are varying methods by which an adhesive can be coated onto a substrate, but solvent coating has dominated in the medical industry for many years. Solvent-coated silicone, acrylic, and rubber-based adhesives are widely used as medical adhesive solutions. Despite their popularity, solvent-coated adhesives are far from a perfect answer to the medical market’s needs. Solvents may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and even carcinogens that can be dangerous to humans. There are also major concerns regarding outgassing or leaching from solvent- coated adhesives in medical settings. As a process, solvent coating is not especially efficient with adhesives requiring drying, which can limit speed and cost-effectiveness of processing.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Materials / Adhesives / Coatings, Bio-Medical, Briefs, Briefs, Coatings & Adhesives


Humanlike Articulated Robotic Headform for Respirator Fit Testing

The testing of individual respiratory protection (IRP) devices is now accomplished with panels of human wearers. Historical attempts to simulate the human face and head have been unsuccessful for a variety of reasons that include imprecision in reproduction of facial dimensions and unrepresentative textures of the surfaces applied to headforms.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Briefs, Briefs


Visual Image Sensor Organ Replacement

This innovation is a system that augments human vision through a technique called “Sensing Super-position” using a Visual Instrument Sensory Organ Replacement (VISOR) device. The VISOR device translates visual and other sensors (i.e., thermal) into sounds to enable very difficult sensing tasks.

Posted in: Biosensors, Imaging & Diagnostics, Software, Bio-Medical, Briefs, Briefs, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Sensors


Wireless Body Area Networks for Health Monitoring

A wireless personal health monitoring system using smartphones to upload data could revolutionize US healthcare. Faculty in the departments of electrical and computer engineering are leading research in mHealth at The University of Alabama in Huntsville. mHealth capitalizes on what Dr. Emil Jovanov, associate dean for graduate education and research in the College of Engineering, calls “major revolutions” in computer informatics, smartphones, and energy-efficient and miniaturized electronics and sensors. It can provide health information to the patient directly, to the physician via the Internet, and to researchers as aggregated databases.

Posted in: Electronics, FDA Compliance/Regulatory Affairs, Imaging & Diagnostics, Software, Bio-Medical, Briefs, Briefs, Diagnostics, FDA Compliance/Regulatory Affairs


Integrating Force Sensors into Robotic Surgery

Force sensing resistors provide tactile feedback during robotic surgery. Due to advances in electronics and technology, robotic surgery has become increasingly popular. Surgeons no longer have to operate directly on a patient, but instead can control a robot to carry out the procedure. Robotic surgery has benefits to both the surgeon and the patient. For the surgeon, robots display 3D visualization for enhanced viewing of the operative area and improve the control, precision, and range of motion of smaller instruments. While robotic surgery may seem like the future of the medical industry, it still has obstacles to overcome. One significant disadvantage to robotic surgery is the lack of haptic technology, which provides physical sensations that enable electronics to give their users force feedback.

Posted in: Biosensors, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Surgical Robotics/Instruments, Bio-Medical, Briefs, Briefs, Surgical Robotics/Instruments, Sensors


Addressing Compliance Mandates with Product Lifecycle Management

How lifecycle management software can enhance product development. Regulations from the FDA impact every step of the medical device lifecycle from properly classifying a device and developing a regulatory strategy, to preparing FDA submissions. So, just how are successful medical device manufacturers cost effectively achieving compliance while, at the same time, meeting their product delivery targets?

Posted in: FDA Compliance/Regulatory Affairs, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Software, Bio-Medical, Briefs, Briefs, Simulation Software


Improving Single-Patient-Use Model with Disposable Blood Pressure Cuff

Single-use cuff could cut infection spread. Each year, hospital-acquired infections cost hospitals approximately $5 billion in the United States, according to a report in the American Journal of Infection Control. Reducing infection spread helps hospitals avoid these costs and improve patient safety. To help reduce cross-contamination, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend the use of patient-dedicated products. While catheters, gloves, and the like are high on the hospital’s radar to help address this, blood pressure cuffs are often overlooked, despite research that shows that blood pressure cuffs used on multiple patients can transmit pathogens such as MRSA or C. diff. The single-patient-use cuff solutions that do exist are traditionally expensive, wasteful, and difficult to implement.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Materials / Adhesives / Coatings, Bio-Medical, Briefs, Briefs, Plastics, Patient Monitoring