Home

Sensors Monitor Dangerous Hits on the Football Field

In football, a tackle can supply 100 Gs of force or more, well above the amount that can cause a concussion and more than 10 times the force of an F‑16 jet roll maneuver. University of Florida (UF) researchers are using the helmets of Gator football players to help measure the force of on‑field hits to better understand and prevent concussions, and treat them before they cause lasting damage.

Posted in: News, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Sensors, Monitoring, Test & Measurement

Read More >>

2014 Create the Future Design: Medical Category Winner

HemeChip for Early Diagnosis of Sickle Cell Disease Yunus Alapan, Ryan Ung, Megan Romelfanger, Asya Akkus, Connie Piccone, Jane Little, and Umut Gurkan Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH“Our motivation in development of the HemeChip stems from the needs of the people, as do all technological developments. We believe adaptation and translation of high-end technologies in medicine from the laboratory benchtop to the point-of-care has a lot to offer in diagnostics and monitoring of complicated diseases, such as sickle cell disease, in resource-limited settings. Our HemeChip design addresses the challenges widely encountered in these resource-limited settings. We hope this award will help us reach out to potential benefactors, investors, and companies for further support in diagnosis of sickle cell disease in newborns.”The Hemoglobin-Electrophoresis Biochip (HemeChip) can rapidly, easily, and conclusively identify the hemoglobin type in blood to diagnose Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) in newborns. The HemeChip can accurately identify hemoglobin type in a drop of blood. The ultimate goal is to reduce the footprint of hemoglobin screening for newborns down to the size of a credit card via HemeChip, which can be easily carried in a pocket together with a smartphone for mobile analysis.

Posted in: Articles, Medical

Read More >>

Detecting High Stress in Oral Interviews and Text Documents

Content of an interview or text is subjected to various levels of statistical analysis to determine if the person knows the truth and is communicating it. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California When a person is interviewed, some of the answers may be inaccurate, or even deceptive, because the person may have either incomplete information, is telling only part of the truth, or is fabricating a false answer, or a combination of all three. When the person is habitually making statements that are known to be false, or only partly true, emotional and/or intellectual conflicts often arise within them, and these conflicts may become manifest by inconsistencies in use of different parts of speech or in logical relationships between statements. These inconsistencies are more subtle than inconsistencies in factual statements, and identification of these inconsistencies is more difficult and less straightforward than identification of factual inconsistencies.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Electronics & Computers, Information Sciences, Medical, Data Acquisition

Read More >>

Predicting Heart Age Using Electrocardiography

Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas Knowledge of a patient’s cardiac age, or “heart age,” could prove useful to both patients and physicians for encouraging lifestyle changes that are potentially beneficial for cardiovascular health. This may be particularly true for patients who exhibit symptoms, but who test negative for cardiac pathology.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Electronics & Computers, Information Sciences, Medical, Data Acquisition

Read More >>

Prediction of Visual Acuity from Wavefront Aberrations

This automated vision test is accurate, simple, and fast. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California Visual acuity (clearness of vision) usually is measured by an eye doctor using an eye chart. It measures the smallest letters that can be reliably identified by the patient at a specified distance. The traditional test requires the patient to look and report which letters they see.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Medical

Read More >>

Mobility Augmentation System Using Switchable Spring Mechanisms

This system could be used by disabled persons and individuals in rehabilitation who require prosthetics. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California The disclosed device provides key elements to enabling compact exercise machines that overcome many of the disadvantages of the current spacesuit, as well as medical prosthetics and exoskeletons. The mechanism is based on switchable, curved, leaf, and torsion spring mechanisms that support the user joints and at the contact with the ground to enable high-speed, low-loss locomotion. The springs are primed with an actuator to counteract losses and recycle the user’s elastic energy in the locomotion. The mechanism is designed to be switchable and to allow for removing the springs from the structure for fine control. Adjustable hard-stops are embedded into each joint to prevent overextension and optimize the performance at each gait. The spring mechanisms are made from carbon fiber composites to reduce the weight of the system. The components of this mechanism can be structurally connected to each other via a mechanical clutch to form a symmetric lower-extremity system with a passive spring mechanism to reduce the requirement of the joints to dampen the impact forces and recycle some of the energy of walking and running.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Medical

Read More >>

Pulley Mechanism Improves Hand Function After Surgery

Engineers at Oregon State University have developed and successfully demonstrated a simple pulley mechanism to improve hand function after surgery. The device is one of the first instruments ever created that could improve the transmission of mechanical forces and movement while implanted inside the body.

Posted in: News, Mechanical Components, Medical, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy, Motion Control

Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.