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Engaging stakeholders in the home medical device market

The Growing Home Medical Device Market – How Could It Impact Med Tech Stakeholders? 90% of patients prefer digital technology tools (such as mobile apps) over medication, per an October 2013 survey by Digitas Health. And, Semico Research's Aging in Place: The Internet of Things for the Golden Years forecasts that the home medical device market will reach $30 billion in revenues by 2017. Gain expert insight into engaging stakeholders of the growing home medical device market - including implications for manufacturers, intended device uses, end users, safety and essential performance, transformation requirements, mobile apps + more.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers

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Robotic Walker Helps Patients Regain Natural Gait

Researchers from the National University of Singapore have invented a novel robotic walker that helps patients carry out physical therapy sessions to regain their leg movements and natural gait. The system also increases productivity of physiotherapists, and improves the quality of rehabilitation sessions. The walker can support a patient’s weight while providing the right amount of force at the pelvis to help the patient walk with a natural gait.

Posted in: News, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy

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Imaging Via Nanoparticles Could Monitor Cancer and Other Diseases

MIT chemists have developed new nanoparticles that can simultaneously perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescent imaging in living animals. Such particles could help scientists to track specific molecules produced in the body, monitor a tumor’s environment, or determine whether drugs have successfully reached their targets. The researchers have demonstrated the use of the particles, which carry distinct sensors for fluorescence and MRI, to track vitamin C in mice. Wherever there is a high concentration of vitamin C, the particles show a strong fluorescent signal but little MRI contrast. If there is not much vitamin C, a stronger MRI signal is visible but fluorescence is very weak. The researchers are now working to enhance the signal differences that they get when the sensor encounters a target molecule such as vitamin C. They have also created nanoparticles carrying the fluorescent agent plus up to three different drugs. This allows them to track whether the nanoparticles are delivered to their targeted locations. These particles could also be used to evaluate the level of oxygen radicals in a patient’s tumor, which can reveal valuable information about how aggressive the tumor is. Source:

Posted in: News, Patient Monitoring

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VINCENT Systems Prosthetics Give Patients A New Feel For Life

The human hand is a biomechanical marvel, but our hands are easy to take for granted because we depend on them all day long. People without all or part of their hands, however, know full well the value of what is missing as they struggle to perform even simple, everyday tasks.

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Ultrasound Creates 3D Haptic Shapes

Touch feedback, known as haptics, has been used in entertainment, rehabilitation, and even surgical training. University of Bristol researchers, using ultrasound, have developed an invisible 3D haptic shape that can be seen and felt.Led by Dr Ben Long and colleagues Professor Sriram Subramanian, Sue Ann Seah, and Tom Carter from the University of Bristol’s Department of Computer Science, the research could change the way 3D shapes are used.  The new technology could enable surgeons to explore a CT scan by enabling them to feel a disease, such as a tumor, using haptic feedback.By focusing complex patterns of ultrasound, the air disturbances can be seen as floating 3D shapes. Visually, the researchers have demonstrated the ultrasound patterns by directing the device at a thin layer of oil so that the depressions in the surface can be seen as spots when lit by a lamp.The system generates an invisible three-dimensional shape that can be added to 3D displays to create an image that can be seen and felt. The research team have also shown that users can match a picture of a 3D shape to the shape created by the system. SourceAlso: Learn about an Ophthalmic Ultrasound System for Ocular Structures.

Posted in: News

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NASA's Hot 100 Technologies: Health, Medicine & Biotechnology

Atomic Oxygen Texturing and Cleaning Atomic oxygen oxidizes and removes biologically active contaminants, and reduces the contaminant to an inactive ash. Thus, the contaminant is both sterile and biologically inactive. The resulting surface is entirely free of any bacteria, viruses, prions, cells, or any organic matter. Currently, 3/4 of orthopedic implants have measurable amounts of endotoxins. Atomic oxygen could totally eliminate these endotoxins, greatly reducing chances of post-operative inflammation.

Posted in: Articles, Techs for License

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The Stealth E-Bike: Challenges in Developing the First Fully Integrated Drive System for E-Bikes

The idea of a bike with pedal assistance is very old, dating back to 1860, when pedal assistance was thought of as a steam machine that would give power to the back wheel of a bike. In 1895, the first direct-drive hub motor was developed, which, as a concept, still remains today. In 1897, the first idea for a mid-drive system was born, but wasn’t quite a finished idea. In 1898, the idea was developed of a direct-drive motor that is concentric with a shaft that powers a rotor atop the rear tire to make a friction drive. As decades went on, other concepts for e-bikes were developed, using drive systems only in the front wheel or the back wheel. FAZUA is launching the future of e-bikes in 2015 with what the company calls the mid-drive 2.0. It’s a mid-drive system with an integrated gear reduction that is smaller, lighter, and integrated in the bike so the e-bike actually still looks and feels like a bike – because it actually still is a bike.

Posted in: White Papers

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