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Smartphones Become "Eye-Phones" to Capture Images of the Eye

Two inexpensive adapters enable a smartphone to capture high-quality images of the front and back of the eye, enabling users to share them securely with other health practitioners or store it in a patient's electronic record. The researchers see this technology as an opportunity to increase access to eye-care services as well as to improve the ability to advise on patient care remotely.

Posted in: News, PCs/Portable Computers, Diagnostics, Patient Monitoring

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The True Cost of Bearing Lubrication

Today, machine and equipment manufacturers are feeling more pressure than ever to reduce costs without sacrificing machine performance and this balancing act can be difficult to achieve. Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) often overlook a simple solution that can have a positive, long-term impact on profitability for themselves and their customers: the elimination of bearing lubricant. By eliminating lubrication systems where possible, OEMs can reduce production costs, while at the same time making their equipment more marketable and less expensive to operate for the end users.

Posted in: Mechanical Components, Bio-Medical, White Papers, White Papers, White Papers

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$19 Million Funding Awarded for Additive Manufacturing Projects

Fifteen projects have received funding for applied R&D projects in additive manufacturing. America Makes, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute, announced the 15 awardees of its second call for additive manufacturing (AM) applied research and development projects. Driven by the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining, America Makes will provide $9 million in funding toward these projects with $10.3 million in matching cost share from the awarded project teams for total funding worth $19.3 million. The projects are expected to commence in early Spring.

Posted in: Briefs, Briefs

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Making Injection Molding More Energy Efficient

Thin-film heating can improve the quality of plastic parts. In the future, thin-film heating will allow plastic parts to be produced with greatly improved surface quality. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM, Freiburg, Germany, say they have found a way to make the whole process more energy efficient.

Posted in: Briefs, Briefs

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Using Molded Foam Makes Assembly a Snap

Today, medical devices are made using a variety of plastic materials and manufacturing processes. Advances in plastic processing make it possible to obtain virtually any shape, form, or function. In addition, the vast assortment of plastics available allows designers to design for the optimal balance of functionality, performance, and cost. Expanded polypropylene (EPP) is a plastic material that is starting to gain traction in the medical device market as product designers become more familiar with the multiple benefits it can provide.

Posted in: Briefs, Briefs

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Updated Facts on 2015 HCFC-225 Usage Ban

Beginning January 1, 2015, HCFC-225, a common precision solvent for high-end cleaning, will be banned for usage. How will this affect end-users? In 1974, Sherwood Rowland and Mario Molina discovered that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were depleting the ozone layer, and in 1995, they received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for this work. In response, the United Nations Environment Programme called an international conference to discuss the issue. Shortly thereafter, the US banned all non-essential uses of CFCs as propellants in aerosols. The Montreal Protocol required all developed countries to begin the phase-out of CFCs in 1993 and reduce CFCs to 50% of the baseline by 1998. A timeline for the phase out of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) was created in 1997. To meet the 90% total reduction requirement for all HCFCs by 2015, HCFC-225 is now being phased out.

Posted in: Briefs, Briefs

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Diagnosing Wrist Problems in Motion with MRI

“Active-MRI” could diagnose wrist problems sooner. Moving images could be invaluable when it comes to diagnosing wrist problems say a group of researchers at University of California-Davis. The multi-disciplinary team of radiologists, medical physicists, and orthopaedic surgeons say that they have found a way to create “movies” of the wrist in motion using a series of brief magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Called “Active-MRI,” the technique could be used to diagnose subtle changes in physiology that indicate the onset of conditions such as wrist instability.

Posted in: Briefs, Briefs

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