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Inkjet Technology Prints 'Soft Robot' Circuits

A new potential manufacturing approach from Purdue University researchers harnesses inkjet printing to create devices made of liquid alloys. The resulting stretchable electronics are compatible with soft machines, such as robots that must squeeze through small spaces, or wearable electronics.

Posted in: News, News, Surgical Robotics/Instruments

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Selecting Miniature Motors for your Medical Devices

The creation of small, portable infusion pumps opened a new chapter in medical care. A patient can receive carefully metered and timed doses of medicine, without requiring a visit to the medical practitioner, allowing life to be less restrictive. Ambulatory pumps have been developed to deliver insulin, nutritive supplements and anticancer drugs.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers

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Avoiding Common Mistakes in Extractables/Leachables Program Design

Mistakes in program design for extractables/leachables testing can lead to significant delays, rounds of questions, and the need for additional testing. And, in some cases, all of the extractables/leachables testing may need to be repeated. To avoid these costly mistakes, it is important to understand the current standards as well as the current interpretations and opinions from regulators interpreting these standards. In this whitepaper the experts from WuXi AppTec discuss the current standards, interpretations and will provide you with tips to avoid common mistakes when designing your program.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers

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How to Define and Build a Risk Management Strategy for Quality and Compliance Management Systems

How can an organization ensure compliance and streamline the process while mitigating costs? The solution is Risk Management. Many organizations are beginning to use Risk to objectively and systematically streamline their compliance. This white paper uncovers the strategy behind risk in compliance, and the best practices in defining proactive and reactive factors of risk within each organization to reach the highest possible level of quality and compliance.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers

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The Benefits of 3D Printing for Medical Implant and Prostheses Development

3D printing is one of the world’s fastest growing technologies, and is already revolutionizing the many areas of medical manufacturing in ways similar to how computers revolutionized communication. Using the right input, medical files such as 2D imaging (MRI or CT scans) can be used to create customized anatomical models, medical devices, and prosthetics. Manufacturing parts in this way reduces time and cost by as much as 80-90%. In this white paper from Stratasys, find out how medical professionals are actively exploring the vast possibilities that 3D printing offers.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers

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Retinal Light Processing Using Carbon Nanotubes

This chip can be used as an electrical or optical sensor for the retina. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California NASA has patented a new technology called the Vision Chip, an implantable device that has the potential to restore or supplement visual function in a diseased or damaged retina. This technology could benefit millions of people in the US and globally who suffer from degenerative diseases of the eye’s retina such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and, in some cases, diabetic retinopathy. The Vision Chip is targeted to treat AMD and other degenerative diseases of the retina by replacing a compromised retinal photoreceptor system with an array of equivalent external photoreceptors and carbon nanotube (CNT) “towers” (bundles of CNTs) that provide a pathway to transmit signals from the external photoreceptors to an active layer of retina.

Posted in: Briefs

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Provision of Carbon Nanotube Buckypaper Cages for Immune Shielding of Cells, Tissues, and Medical Devices

This method may prevent the rejection of transplanted cells and tissue. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California NASA has patented a new technology that may prevent the rejection of transplanted cells and tissues. The human immune system identifies and rejects non-host cells and tissues with high efficiency. The new invention involves the fabrication and use of carbon nanotube buckypaper (CNTBP) “cages” for immune shielding. This approach promotes and supports a variety of useful biological processes that are difficult or impossible when cells or tissue are maintained in culture outside the body. It allows for the transplantation of cells or tissues from unrelated donors or from unrelated species (xenografts) into host subjects with dramatically reduced potential for rejection and/or the use of immunosuppressive therapies, which can be highly toxic. Current strategies for islet cell transplantation, for example, have shown marginal success due to limited graft survival, even with immunosuppressive therapy.

Posted in: Briefs

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