Home

Robotic Exoskeleton Vastly Improves Quality of Life

Worldwide an estimated 185 million people use a wheelchair daily. A company based in Auckland, New Zealand, has developed an innovative robotic technology that helps people with mobility impairment get back on their feet— the Rex Bionics robotic exoskeleton. Its integrated maxon motors help to ensure smooth limb movement.

Posted in: Biosensors, Implants & Prosthetics, Mechanical Components, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy, Features, Articles, Electronics, Power Management, Power Supplies, Implants & Prosthetics, Orthopedics, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy, Motors & Drives, Positioning Equipment, Power Transmission

Read More >>

Sterilization of Bioresorbable Polymers

Sterilization method should be considered during the design phase. Bioresorbable polymers for medical devices encompass a broad class of materials with two of the more common materials being poly(L-lactic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid). Some terminal sterilization processes may result in changes in materials properties, thereby significantly impacting the functional behavior of bioresorbable implants. Matching a terminal sterilization method to a bioresorbable implant requires the materials properties of the device to be considered as part of the product development process. Currently, there are several types of terminal sterilization processes in use for these polymers, including gamma radiation, e-beam radiation, and ethylene oxide (EtO). Steri lization with nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas provides a room-temperature alternative that should be considered for this class of materials.

Posted in: Custom & Contract Manufacturing, Implants & Prosthetics, Materials / Adhesives / Coatings, Monitoring & Testing, Packaging, Bio-Medical, Briefs, Briefs, Coatings & Adhesives, Composites, Plastics, Implants & Prosthetics

Read More >>

Laser Marking for ID and Traceability Within the Medical Industry

Laser marking provides easy and effective labeling for medical devices. The use of lasers to mark surgical instruments has become of greater significance, however, the parameters used in these applications are not always fully appreciated. The medical industry, in particular, has utilized laser technology primarily to mark, weld, and cut medical devices for years. Lasers address the need for microscopic applications: to cut widths measurable in microns, spot welds with heat affected zones barely visible to the unaided eye, and highly resolved biocompatible markings that enable traceability of instruments and implants. In common with other industries, medical devices and pharmaceutical businesses turn to lasers for a one-step, fast, flexible, permanent, and a highly automated marking process.

Posted in: Custom & Contract Manufacturing, Optics/Photonics, Packaging, Bio-Medical, Briefs, Briefs, FDA Compliance/Regulatory Affairs, Fiber Optics, Lasers & Laser Systems

Read More >>

FRET-Aptamer Assays for Bone Marker Assessment, C-Telopeptide, Creatinine, and Vitamin D

Applications include assessment of osteoporosis, and aptamer assays for veterinary analytes, infectious disease, food- and water-borne pathogens, and chemical/biological threats. Astronauts lose 1.0 to 1.5% of their bone mass per month on long-duration spaceflights. NASA wishes to monitor the bone loss onboard spacecraft to develop nutritional and exercise countermeasures, and make adjustments during long space missions. On Earth, the same technology could be used to monitor osteoporosis and its therapy.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Briefs

Read More >>

Medicine Delivery Device With Integrated Sterilization and Detection

This automated medicine delivery device would ensure that patients receive medication on schedule and at the right dosage level. Sterile delivery devices can be created by integrating a medicine delivery instrument with surfaces that are coated with germicidal and anti-fouling material. This requires that a large-surface- area template be developed within a constrained volume to ensure good contact between the delivered medicine and the germicidal material. Both of these can be integrated using JPLdeveloped silicon nanotip or cryo-etch black silicon technologies with atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of specific germicidal layers.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Briefs

Read More >>

100 Percent Solids: Superior Adhesive Technology for the Medical Industry

Adhesives using 100 percent solids coating act fast, without need for solvents. In the medical industry, adhesives play a crucial role in applications ranging from diagnostics and device assembly to transdermal and wound care. There are varying methods by which an adhesive can be coated onto a substrate, but solvent coating has dominated in the medical industry for many years. Solvent-coated silicone, acrylic, and rubber-based adhesives are widely used as medical adhesive solutions. Despite their popularity, solvent-coated adhesives are far from a perfect answer to the medical market’s needs. Solvents may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and even carcinogens that can be dangerous to humans. There are also major concerns regarding outgassing or leaching from solvent- coated adhesives in medical settings. As a process, solvent coating is not especially efficient with adhesives requiring drying, which can limit speed and cost-effectiveness of processing.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Materials / Adhesives / Coatings, Bio-Medical, Briefs, Briefs, Coatings & Adhesives

Read More >>

Humanlike Articulated Robotic Headform for Respirator Fit Testing

The testing of individual respiratory protection (IRP) devices is now accomplished with panels of human wearers. Historical attempts to simulate the human face and head have been unsuccessful for a variety of reasons that include imprecision in reproduction of facial dimensions and unrepresentative textures of the surfaces applied to headforms.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Briefs, Briefs

Read More >>