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Fast Algorithms for Model-Based Diagnosis

Methods based on Boolean functions and linear programming are more practical for complex systems. Two improved new methods for automated diagnosis of complex engineering systems involve the use of novel algorithms that are more efficient than prior algorithms used for the same purpose. Both the recently developed algorithms and the prior algorithms in question are instances of model-based diagnosis, which is based on exploring the logical inconsistency between an observation and a description of a system to be diagnosed.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Calculation Management Captures and Tracks Engineering Design Information

A systematic software approach enables designers to manage engineering methods and values.

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Telephone-Directory Program

eDirectory is a computer program that makes it possible to view entries in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) telephone directory by use of PalmPilot ™ (or equivalent) personal digital assistants.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Fuzzy Logic Engine

The Fuzzy Logic Engine is a software package that enables users to embed fuzzy-logic modules into their application programs.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Encryption for Remote Control via Internet or Intranet

This protocol provides security against control by unauthorized users.

Posted in: Briefs

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Scheme for Entering Binary Data Into a Quantum Computer

This could be an important step toward making quantum computing practical.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Simulation of Laser Cooling and Trapping in Engineering Applications

This design instrument shows good agreement with experimental measurements. An advanced computer code is undergoing development for numerically simulating laser cooling and trapping of large numbers of atoms. The code is expected to be useful in practical engineering applications and to contribute to understanding of the roles that light, atomic collisions, background pressure, and numbers of particles play in experiments using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms. The code is based on semiclassical theories of the forces exerted on atoms by magnetic and optical fields. Whereas computer codes developed previously for the same purpose account for only a few physical mechanisms, this code incorporates many more physical mechanisms (including atomic collisions, sub-Doppler cooling mechanisms, Stark and Zeeman energy shifts, gravitation, and evanescent-wave phenomena) that affect laser-matter interactions and the cooling of atoms to submillikelvin temperatures. Moreover, whereas the prior codes can simulate the interactions of at most a few atoms with a resonant light field, the number of atoms that can be included in a simulation by the present code is limited only by computer memory. Hence, the present code represents more nearly completely the complex physics involved when using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms in engineering applications.

Posted in: Photonics, Briefs, TSP

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