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Hazards Analysis Management Tool

Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland The Hazard Analysis Management Tool (HAMT) is comprised of a database and user interface that manages hazard analysis information, manages hazard verifications, and manages relationships between hazard attributes and project elements. The tool offers numerous benefits including the ability for multiple users to simultaneously update information, auto-generation of hazard reports, improved data consistency, ability to quickly obtain up-to-date status reports, and the ability to execute complex queries on the hazard information. This tool does not provide a mechanism for the identification of hazards. The tool requires minimal IT overhead and is easily tailored for specific projects and/or user groups. This tool was developed as a support capability, and testing was limited to the operational environment in which it was initially deployed.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Electronics & Computers

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Developing Web and Mobile Applications Integrated with Systems Utilizing the Object Management Group’s Data Distribution Service

DDS-enabled applications range from human-computer interaction to data recording and retrieval. John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida Several software application development tools exist that enable the rapid development of Web applications. Among other things, Web applications greatly enhance the human-computer interaction (HCI) required by many systems, while simplifying the problem of deploying applications to customers. Capitalizing on the new features provided by these tools could prove to be a boon to mission and project teams.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Electronics & Computers

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Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization — SIMO

Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland Space-based interferometry missions have the potential to revolutionize imaging and astrometry, providing observations of unprecedented accuracy. Realizing the full potential of these interferometers poses several significant technological challenges. These include the efficient maneuvering of multiple collectors to various baselines to make the requisite observations; regulating the path-length of science light from the collecting telescopes to the combining instrument with nanometer accuracy, despite the presence of vibration induced by internal and external disturbance sources; and demonstrating through hardware-in-the-loop simulation that the numerous spacecraft (SC) subsystems can be coordinated to perform such challenging observations in a precise, efficient, and robust manner.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Electronics & Computers

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Gas and Vapor Sensors on Paper

These sensors can be used wherever chemical or gas sensors are used, such as in mining, security, biomedical, food processing, and agriculture. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California Sensors on paper have been proposed and fabricated to identify gas or vapors (chemicals). Traditional sensors are based on hard substrates such as silicon. Sensors fabricated on paper are cheaper, foldable, flexible, and bio - degradable. Paper electronics is an emerging area. Logic devices, memory, RFID (radio-frequency identification) tags, etc. have been demonstrated. Sensors on paper will be another building block to achieve complete, true paper electronics.

Posted in: Briefs, Sensors

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Intelligent Flamefinder Detection and Alert System

This method detects and localizes both leaks and flames of hydrogen. Stennis Space Center, Mississippi While NASA facilities already use huge volumes of hydrogen as a propellant/fuel, many other federal and state programs across the country are looking at potentially expanding the use of hydrogen. There are, however, significant challenges associated with hydrogen use. These include a tendency to leak through seals (due to the very small size of the hydrogen atom) that ordinarily would efficiently stop most other materials, a very high diffusion rate, a huge explosive mixture range, and the fact that hydrogen burns with an invisible flame. Therefore, hydrogen leak detection is an important capability associated with a safe and operational work environment for NASA facilities, as well as at any other location/site that would potentially use this fuel. At the time of this reporting, there is not a technology that provides simple, inexpensive, and wide-coverage methods that enable large quantities of hydrogen to be monitored. Sensors that are available tend to be limited to either a very short range, or have no directionality. For instance, a standard hydrogen sensor detects an increase in hydrogen, but cannot determine if that increase is from a small leak nearby or a larger leak some distance upwind. A technology that is capable of alerting and providing emergency detection information about hydrogen leakage would be beneficial and increase overall safety.

Posted in: Briefs, Sensors

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Load-Indicating Sensor for Lines and Cords

Tension-indicating device will indicate the peak load that the cord is subjected to. Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas During the development of parachute systems, it is desirable to size the lines correctly, and to pack and deploy the parachute in a manner that produces uniform loading among the lines. Analytical methods would greatly reduce the cost of development; however, test verification is essential. This is extremely difficult to do with small lines, as there may be hundreds of lines in a multi-parachute deployment. The load-indicating sensors developed at JSC are extremely small, do not interfere with packing, do not change the load capacity of the lines, and can be inserted into an existing, assembled parachute system.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Sensors

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Products of Tomorrow: May 2015

The technologies NASA develops don’t just blast off into space. They also improve our lives here on Earth. Life-saving search-and-rescue tools, implantable medical devices, advances in commercial aircraft safety, increased accuracy in weather forecasting, and the miniature cameras in our cellphones are just some of the examples of NASA-developed technology used in products today.

Posted in: Articles, Products

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