Special Coverage

Iodine-Compatible Hall Effect Thruster
Precision Assembly of Systems on Surfaces (PASS)
Development of a Novel Electrospinning System with Automated Positioning and Control Software
2016 Create The Future Design Contest Open For Entries
Clamshell Sampler
Shape Memory Alloy Rock Splitter
Deployable Extra-Vehicular Activity Platform (DEVAP) for Planetary Surfaces
Home

Wartime medical device is saving lives at home

A patient at the University of California Davis Medical Center was losing blood from multiple gunshot wounds, and doctors feared he was not going to survive long enough for them to operate. The newly approved REBOA catheter was used to restore blood flow to his critical organs so they could save his life.  "Air Force research conducted at the CIF directly contributed to saving the life of this 28-year-old father of six," said Air Force Maj. Timothy Williams, 60th SGCS vascular surgeon. "I have done trauma surgery all of my professional life, including work at three civilian level I trauma centers and three deployments. I can, without reservation, state that REBOA saved his life." The CIF is the Clinical Investigation Facility located at David Grant USAF Medical Center, one of seven Air Force medical facilities with formal clinical investigation programs and resources.  Approved by the FDA in January, the REBOA (resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta) catheter was developed by researchers to slow bleeding, without damaging vital organs, so a patient can receive life-saving care. This device is inserted into a hemorrhaging vessel and stops or slows the blood flow to that injury while allowing blood flow to continue to vital organs and other body parts.   The idea originated at the 59th Medical Wing at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas, the main hub for autopsies performed on combat casualties. Air Force Maj. Lucas Neff, 60th SGCS vascular surgeon, explained: "The autopsies showed that the No. 1 cause of potentially survivable deaths by service members is noncompressible hemorrhaging in the chest and core. We have worked on techniques (with the REBOA) that allow us to control the amount of blood flow that can pass while using the catheter. It's like a faucet, where you can turn the flow down in areas where there is bleeding without turning it completely off, allowing blood to flow to other important areas."  Williams and Neff were deployed together to Afghanistan in 2014. "I don't know if I would've gone down this road of research if it wasn't for that deployment," Williams said. "Having actually been there and seen the casualties firsthand brought me to this research."

Posted in: News

Read More >>

Will solar power supplant fossil fuels as a primary energy source?

This week's Question: The US now has 1 million solar power installations, and some industry experts expect the number of solar-power systems to increase dramatically in the span of two years. “By the end of 2020, the amount of installed solar capacity will be 300 percent higher than today,” said Dan Whitten, vice president of communications at the Solar Energy Industries Association, noting that the nationwide number grew 10 times between 2008 and 2015. This month, the Swedish furniture giant Ikea also recently announced the opening of its “Solar Shop,” which will sell panels and setup services. Two major challenges for the solar panel industry have been cost and capacity; compared to fossil fuel costs, solar panel installations can be time-consuming and expensive. What do you think? Will solar power supplant fossil fuels as a primary energy source? 

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

The Best Springs You Haven't Tried Yet

Flat wire wave springs offer the best balance of size and spring force. Here’s what you need to know to design with these high-performance alternatives to traditional springs. Discussed in this paper are the different styles of wave springs and the design advantages offered to the engineer, such as axial space savings, no torsional loads, consistent spring force, dimensional tolerances improvements, increased travel, etc. Additionally it shows some application examples and includes a formulas page for spring calculations.

Posted in: White Papers

Read More >>

Understanding New Robotics Trends So You Don’t Fall Behind

Components like cables and connectors must keep pace with today’s advanced robotics technology. Without a reliable source for power and signal, even the sturdiest robots will fail.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars

Read More >>

Ensuring Reliability and Safety of Connected Car Technology

In conjunction with SAE The internet has now come to the automobile, bringing connectivity for infotainment, telematics and vehicle data analytics. The connected car is rapidly becoming a key node in the emerging Internet of Things. While connected car technology is a bonus and a pleasure for car buyers, it poses unprecedented new engineering challenges regarding reliability, safety and security for car manufacturers.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars

Read More >>

John Hanson, Nodes Deputy Project Manager and Technical Lead, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA

John Hanson, Nodes Deputy Project Manager and Technical Lead, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA On December 6, 2015, two small satellites, or CubeSats, successfully launched to the International Space Station. As part of NASA’s Nodes mission, the CubeSats will soon communicate with each other and demonstrate the benefits of a networked “swarm” of spacecraft.

Posted in: Who's Who

Read More >>

'Smart' Paper Responds to Gestures

Researchers from the University of Washington, Disney Research, and Carnegie Mellon University have added sensing capabilities  to a piece of paper. Small radio frequency (RFID) tags are placed, printed, or drawn onto the "PaperID" technology to create interactive, lightweight interfaces.

Posted in: News

Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.