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310 nm, sub 800 ps Picosecond Pulsed LED

Edinburgh Instruments (Livingston, UK) has released a 310 nm picosecond pulsed LED with a sub-800 picosecond typical pulse width. This LED is optimized for Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC). The EPLED 310 is a compact, robust, maintenance free, fully integrated system supplied in a single package. It is pre-adjusted for an optimum pulse width of

Posted in: Products, Photonics

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UV-Visible-NIR Polarization Spectroscopy

CRAIC Technologies (San Dimas, CA) recently announced the addition of UV-visible-NIR polarization spectroscopy capabilities to CRAIC microspectrophotometers. This feature is offered as a package that allows the user to measure polarization spectra in either transmission or reflectance modes. With the ability to measure polarization microspectra™ in the ultraviolet, visible and near infrared regions, the UV-visible- NIR polarization package represents a powerful new tool for both materials science and biological research.

Posted in: Products, Photonics

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Coming Soon - Breaking Boundaries: Bioabsorbable Polymers in Device Design

It is well known that programming the performance of a bioabsorbable medical device is paramount to its success. But did you know that a large part of this programming takes place at the component level?

Posted in: Webinars, Upcoming Webinars

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'Gate Sensor' Detects Individual Electrons

A team of European researchers at the University of Cambridge has created an electronic device that detects the charge of a single electron in less than one microsecond. The "gate sensor" could be applied to quantum computers of the future to read information stored in the charge or spin of a single electron.“We have called it a gate sensor because, as well as detecting the movement of individual electrons, the device is able to control its flow as if it were an electronic gate which opens and closes,” said González Zalba, lead researcher from the Hitachi Cambridge Laboratory and the Cavendish Laboratory.The gate sensor is coupled to a silicon nanotransistor where the electrons flow individually. The innovation represents a new technological sector which bases its electronic functionality on the charge of a single electron.SourceAlso: Read more Electrical/Electronics tech briefs.

Posted in: News

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Will triple-decker planes take flight by 2030?

This week's Question: Spanish designer Oscar Vinals recently developed a triple-decker aircraft design. The zero-emission AWWA-QG Progress Eagle would be powered by six hydrogen engines, a wind turbine, and solar panels. Vinals envisions that the plane would be able to take to the skies by 2030. Among the challenges would be finding runways long enough to allow such a large plane to land and take off. What do you think? Will triple-decker planes take flight by 2030?

Posted in: Question of the Week

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New Wearable Device Turns Thumbnail into Trackpad

MIT Media Laboratory researchers are developing a wearable device that turns the user’s thumbnail into a miniature wireless track pad. To build their prototype, the researchers packed capacitive sensors, a battery, and three separate chips — a microcontroller, a Bluetooth radio chip, and a capacitive-sensing chip — into the thumbnail-sized device. The engineers built their sensors by printing copper electrodes on sheets of flexible polyester, which allowed them to experiment with a range of different electrode layouts.The capacitive sensing registers touch. A thin, nonactive layer is placed between the user’s finger and the underlying sensors.The team envisions that the technology could allow users to control wireless devices when their hands are full. The device could also augment other interfaces, as well as enable subtle communication via text. The researchers have also been in discussion with battery manufacturers and have identified a technology that they think could yield a battery that fits in the space of a thumbnail. A special-purpose chip that combines the functions of the microcontroller, radio, and capacitive sensor would further save space.SourceAlso: Read more Sensors tech briefs.

Posted in: News

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Dr. David W. Miller, Chief Technologist, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC

     Dr. David Miller began his term as the NASA chief technologist on March 17, 2014. He currently serves as the agency’s principal advisor and advocate on NASA technology policy and programs. Miller, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has also previously worked with a range of NASA programs including the space shuttle, the International Space Station, the JWST Product Integrity Team, and the NASA CubeSat Launch Initiative.

Posted in: Who's Who

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