Special Coverage

Self-Healing Wire Insulation
Thermomechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Response
Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beams
High Field Superconducting Magnets
Active Response Gravity Offload and Method
Strat-X
Sonar Inspection Robot System
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Introducing Surface Analysis for Automotive Applications

In Conjunction with SAE As the materials used in the construction of automobiles become ever more advanced, the breadth of analytical challenges also increases. The surface or layer chemistry of these materials can be of considerable importance, from understanding the appearance of the paint finish, to tailoring the chemical activity of the catalytic converter in the exhaust system.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars

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Morphing Nanotubes into Tougher Carbon for Aerospace

Rice researchers (l-r) Robert Vajtai, Enrique Barrera, and Sehmus Ozden at the two-stage gas gun used to fire nanotube pellets at hypervelocity speeds. (Jeff Fitlow) Rice University materials scientists are making nanodiamonds and other forms of carbon by smashing nanotubes against a target at high speeds. The process will enrich the knowledge of engineers who design structures that resist damage from high-speed impacts. The diamonds are the result of a detailed study on the ballistic fracturing of carbon nanotubes at different velocities. Such high-energy impacts caused atomic bonds in the nanotubes to break and sometimes recombine into different structures.

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Existing Navigation Data Can Help Pilots Avoid Turbulence

Scientists demonstrated that turbulence can be detected in a much faster and more precise way using data already routinely broadcast by commercial airliners. (FUW, jch) Detecting turbulence remains the Achilles' heel of modern-day aviation. The reports submitted by pilots, subjective and often very inaccurate, are the least expensive and the most frequently used method for trying to predict where it will occur. Scientists from the University of Warsaw demonstrated that turbulence can be detected in a much faster and more precise way using data already routinely broadcast by the aircraft operated by commercial airlines.

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NASA Shines Lasers on Future Aircraft Concept

Boeing engineer Stephen Provost checks out a blended wing body model before a wind tunnel test at NASA Langley. (NASA/David C. Bowman) As NASA aeronautics engineers prepare to develop a series of greener, quieter, faster X-planes, they are already testing concepts that could be candidates. One of those is a Boeing blended wing body (BWB). A blended wing body doesn't look like a conventional airplane. Instead of the usual tube and wing design – it's shaped more like a triangle where the wings are merged into the body. Another difference is that it does not have a tail.

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Avoid Product Launch Failure: Best Practices for Aligning Your Engineering and Quality Teams

Creating quality products in our fast-paced world isn’t easy. Today’s leading companies face greater challenges with shorter development cycles, distributed supply chains, and greater product complexity. Mechanical, electrical, software, and other design teams must work together to support agile, lean, and hybrid development processes. What can your product team do during the development phases to improve product launch success rates?

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Prizes Awarded in Sample Return Robot Challenge

Erica Tiberia is the sole member of a team that was one of five to qualify for the next level of competition. (NASA) Five teams took home prize money after completing Level 1 of NASA’s Sample Return Robot Challenge at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts. Part of the agency’s Centennial Challenges prize program, the contest featured 18 teams of citizen inventors. Each winning team was awarded $5,000 for their success, and has earned a shot at Level 2 of the competition, which will take place Sept. 2-5. The challenge has a total prize purse of $1.5 million.

Posted in: UpFront, Aerospace

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Modeling Acoustics Applications with COMSOL Multiphysics®

If you are interested in modeling industrial acoustics applications such as mobile devices, loudspeakers, car cabins, rooms, sound proofing, and exhaust and muffler systems, tune into this webinar. You will get an introduction to using COMSOL Multiphysics® software for modeling aeroacoustics, vibroacoustics, thermoviscous acoustics, porous materials, Biot models, pressure acoustics, and ray tracing. During the live software demo, you will see firsthand how to set up an ultrasound flow meter model, which combines acoustics and fluid flow. After the presentation, you can ask questions during the Q&A session.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars

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