Special Coverage

Home

Engineers Hope to Create Electronics That Stretch at the Molecular Level

Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego are asking what might be possible if semiconductor materials were flexible and stretchable without sacrificing electronic function?

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Board-Level Electronics, Electronics, Materials, Sensors, Semiconductors & ICs, News

Read More >>

20W High Density DC-DC Converters

Artesyn Embedded Technologies (Tempe, AZ), formerly Emerson Network Power's Embedded Computing & Power business, has announced the new AXA series of compact 20W high power density DC-DC converters. Artesyn AXA series modules cover an ultra-wide 4:1 input voltage range of 9 to 36 VDC and 18 to 75 VDC. The first models available offer single output models with voltages of 3.3, 5, 12, 15 and 24V along with dual output models offering +/- 12 or 15V, all with tight output voltage regulation. Enclosed in a 1.0 x 1.0 x 0.4 inch (25.4 x 25.4 x 10.16 mm) package, the Artesyn AXA series offers up to 89 percent efficiency. http://www.artesyn.com/power/power-supplies/cat/78/1-x-1-inch-low-power-isolated-dc-dc-converters

Posted in: Products

Read More >>

Fanless Transportation Computers

Kontron (Poway, CA) has launched TRACe™, its new family of operational computers designed specifically for the transportation market. The first platform is the TRACe™ B304-TR, which is an EN50155-certified fanless transportation computer designed to make customization easy to meet application-specific requirements. The TRACe™ family benefits from the inherent flexibility advantages of Kontron's COM Express® Computer-on-Module (COM) that features the Intel® Atom™ E3845 processor with up to quad core 1.91 GHz performance. The second member of the family is the Kontron TRACe™ V304- TR, which is an EN50155-certified and tested fanless Network Video Recorder (NVR) that can record and transmit H.264 video streams making it ideally suited for rolling stock IP video surveillance. http://www.kontron.com/industries/transportation/products/trace---intelligent-transportation-computer

Posted in: Products

Read More >>

Connectors

LEMO (Rohnert Park, CA) has added a new connector size to its M Series. The new MM connectors are the most compact in the lightweight M Series product line. The MM connectors are available with 3 or 4 contacts and are some of the smallest IP68 connectors that LEMO offers. With this very small connector, LEMO completes the M series range of connectors for the automotive / racing / aerospace market by offering connectors suitable for cable diameters 2 to 27mm and contact configurations from 2 to 114 contacts. MM Plugs and cable mount sockets come with LEMO's signature ratchet-coupling shells and offer excellent weight and space savings with superior environmental protection. http://www.lemo.com/en

Posted in: Products

Read More >>

Raspberry Pi Model B Enclosure

Hammond Manufacturing (Cheektowaga, NY) has developed a new molded enclosure specifically designed to house the Raspberry Pi Model B credit card sized computer. The 1593HAM is available in translucent blue, grey and black. The Raspberry Pi board clips into the base and, in turn, the top half of the enclosure then clips into the base. A catch secures the assembly and allows the case to be easily opened if required. All I/O capability is directly accessible without having to modify the enclosure. The camera module can be fitted through a slot in the top, or it can be screwed to the inside of the top cover with a hole provided for the lens. A cut out in the split line between the two halves of the case provides access to the GPIO header. Two USB ports, the RJ45 LAN port, the SD carrier, the audio and video RCA ports, the micro USB power-in connector and a HDMI interface are all accessible through apertures of the correct size and shape in the sides of the enclosure. http://www.hammondmfg.com/1593HAM.htm#RaspPi

Posted in: Products

Read More >>

Are You Encouraged by Robots' Increasing Role in the Workplace?

A recent Pew Research Center and Elon University report of nearly 1,900 technology experts suggests that the rise of robots in the workplace could bring both disruptions and benefits. As artificial intelligence replace jobs in factories and shop floors, some pros say that the technology will still not advance enough in the next decade to substantially impact the job market. Other optimists say that society will adapt by inventing new types of work, especially jobs that take advantage of uniquely human capabilities. Skeptics, however, imagine a more unfavorable future, one in which robots and "digital agents" displace many jobs, create income inequality, and lead to unemployment and breakdowns in the social order.

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

NASA Engineer Set to Complete First 3D-Printed Space Cameras

By the end of September, NASA aerospace engineer Jason Budinoff is expected to complete the first imaging telescopes ever assembled almost exclusively from 3D-manufactured components.Under his multi-pronged project, funded by Goddard’s Internal Research and Development (IRAD) program, Budinoff is building a fully functional, 50-millimeter (2-inch) camera whose outer tube, baffles and optical mounts are all printed as a single structure. The instrument is appropriately sized for a CubeSat, a tiny satellite comprised of individual units each about four inches on a side. The instrument will be equipped with conventionally fabricated mirrors and glass lenses and will undergo vibration and thermal-vacuum testing next year.Budinoff also is assembling a 350-millimeter (14-inch) dual-channel telescope whose size is more representative of a typical space telescope.Should he prove the approach, Budinoff said NASA scientists would benefit enormously — particularly those interested in building infrared-sensing instruments, which typically operate at super-cold temperatures to gather the infrared light that can be easily overwhelmed by instrument-generated heat. Often, these instruments are made of different materials. However, if all the instrument’s components, including the mirrors, were made of aluminum, then many of the separate parts could be 3D printed as single structures, reducing the parts count and material mismatch. This would decrease the number of interfaces and increase the instrument’s stability.SourceAlso: Learn about an Image Processing Method To Determine Dust Optical Density.

Posted in: Cameras, Imaging, Photonics, Optics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Aerospace, RF & Microwave Electronics, News

Read More >>