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Vision-Correcting Display Replaces Reading Glasses

UC Berkeley computer and vision scientists are developing computer algorithms to compensate for an individual’s visual impairment. The researchers have created vision-correcting displays that enable users to see text and images clearly without wearing eyeglasses or contact lenses.The algorithm, which was developed at UC Berkeley, works by adjusting the intensity of each direction of light that emanates from a single pixel in an image based upon a user’s specific visual impairment. In a process called deconvolution, the light passes through the pinhole array in such a way that the user will perceive a sharp image.The technology could potentially help hundreds of millions of people who currently need corrective lenses to use their smartphones, tablets and computers. More importantly, the displays could one day aid people with more complex visual problems, known as high order aberrations, which cannot be corrected by eyeglasses, said Brian Barsky, UC Berkeley professor of computer science and vision science, and affiliate professor of optometry.SourceAlso: Learn about Strobing to Mitigate Vibration for Display Legibility.

Posted in: News

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Three Things You Can’t Measure if Your Oscilloscope Doesn’t Have Enough Memory

Modern oscilloscopes come equipped with a host of different attributes, and many vendors tout their latest additions as “must have” features. With so many attributes and marketing messages, recalling the importance of a long-held attribute such as memory depth can become lost in the noise. However, any engineer who has grappled with shallow memory on an oscilloscope will be vocal about the frustration of the experience. Those who aren’t vocal simply haven’t stumbled on an issue that required it — yet.

Posted in: Articles

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ASICs Support Orion’s Onboard Data Network

TTEthernet switch TTTech North America Andover, MA 978-933-7979 www.tttech.com Radiation-tolerant Ethernet backbone ASICs, developed by Honeywell Aerospace and based on TTTech’s TTEthernet switch and end system chip IP cores, are ready for the first NASA Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) test flight later this year. The ASICs are core components of the Onboard Data Network (ODN) and enable the design of advanced integrated system architectures for human-rated spaceflight.

Posted in: Application Briefs

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Etching System Enhances NASA’s Device Fabrication Capabilities

VERSALINE® Deep Silicon Etch™ System Plasma-Therm St. Petersburg, FL 727-577-4999 www.plasmatherm.com NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, CA, recently installed a VERSALINE Deep Silicon Etch system to expand its silicon deep-etching resources. The new etching system targets silicon-based applications that include MEMS, sensors, and resonators. JPL’s Microdevices Laboratory (MDL) serves users with many different requirements, and the system’s mask selectivity, uniformity, vertical profiles, sidewall smoothness, and silicon-on-insulator capabilities will be used to meet their device fabrication needs.

Posted in: Application Briefs

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CMOS Imagers Will Help Study the Sun in SoloHI Mission

CMOS imager engineering units SRI International Menlo Park, CA 650-859-2000 www.sri.com SRI International, working with TowerJazz (Newport Beach, CA), has delivered the first complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager engineering units to the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for use on the Solar Orbiter Heliospheric Imager (SoloHI) optical telescope. With its large field of view, SoloHI will make high-resolution images of the corona and solar wind, and be able to connect remote sensing observations of the corona to the plasma being measured in situ at the spacecraft.

Posted in: Application Briefs

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Solar Refrigerators Store Life-Saving Vaccines

NASA’s battery-free solar technology powers vaccine refrigerators in hot, rural communities. NASA’s photovoltaic (PV) technology has advanced many of its missions. This renewable source of energy is produced when certain photo-emissive materials, such as silicon, eject electrons upon absorbing photons from sunlight. These free electrons can be captured, and the resulting current can be used as electricity. NASA first used solar power in 1958 when Vanguard 1 was successfully launched into space.

Posted in: Articles, Spinoff

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Swan Seal

The seal can be sized to any application while maintaining its important features. John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio This seal features dual sealing capabilities: a face seal and an axial seal. The name swan seal is derived from its cross section, which resembles a swan. Most injector designs require fuel to be delivered from an inlet fitting, through a feed arm, to the injector tip. Temperature variation from the inlet to the tip, from the cool fuel to hot combustion air, and from startup to full power, often poses a challenge due to thermal growth. One of the most challenging areas is accommodating the growth differential between a hot feed arm and a cool fuel delivery tube, which is exacerbated by the relatively long distance. Several methods have been used to allow for this including coiling the fuel tube, utilizing an O-ring sliding seal, metal C-seals, or incorporating stretchable bellows. Some of the drawbacks of these methods include limited space, poor durability at high temperatures, serviceability, long lead times, and cost. The swan seal presents a compact, high-temperature, replaceable, low-cost option for this and other applications where a sliding axial seal is required.

Posted in: Mechanical Components, Briefs, TSP

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