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Trillion-Frame-Per-Second Camera Captures Ultrafast Phenomena

Researchers from Japan have developed a new high-speed camera that can record events at a rate of more than 1-trillion-frames-per-second. The STAMP (Sequentially Timed All-optical Mapping Photography) technology holds promise for the study of complex, ultrafast phenomena.Keiichi Nakagawa, a research fellow at the University of Tokyo, experienced the need for a camera while studying how acoustic shock waves changed living cells. Scientists believe mechanical stress, like that caused by acoustic waves, may increase bone and blood vessel growth, but they had no tools for capturing the dynamics of such a fast, transient event as a shock wave passing through a cell.STAMP relies on a property of light called dispersion. The technology splits an ultrashort pulse of light into a barrage of different colored flashes that hit the imaged object in rapid-fire succession. Each separate color flash can then be analyzed to string together a moving picture of what the object looked like over the time it took the dispersed light pulse to travel through the device. Currently, the team is constructing an improved STAMP system that acquires 25 sequential images. Nakagawa believes the number of frames could eventually be increased to 100 with current technology.The camera could be used to explore a wide range of ultrafast phenomena for the first time, including image electronic motion, the laser ignition of fusion, the phase transition of materials, and the dynamics of a Coulomb explosion, an event in which intense electromagnetic fields can force a small amount of solid material to explode into a hot plasma of ionized atomic particles. SourceAlso: Read other Imaging Tech Briefs.

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New Control Possibilities for Wireless Switches

Wireless controls have been widely accepted and embraced in the industrial community. Widespread use of monitoring devices in the process industry, the deployment of RFID components in a variety of industry segments, and the demonstrated performance of a large, installed base of the technologies serve as evidence of their viability.

Posted in: Articles, Sensors

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The Strain Gauge Gets an Upgrade

The strain gauge, a device commonly used in the aerospace industry to detect stress and deformation, has its limitations. The three copper wires of the strain gauge often lead to labor-intensive efforts; a large, complicated structure requiring 100 strain measurements, for example, means 300 lead wires. As the implementation becomes more complex, the wire bundle itself gets bigger and heavier. Strain gauges are also susceptible to electronic magnetic interference, and the sensors must be spaced out at distant intervals.

Posted in: Articles, Sensors

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Samarium Oxide Glaze

Developed for high-energy pulsed Q-switching infrared laser applications, a new, high-absorption samarium oxide glaze from Morgan Advanced Materials (Windsor, UK) means it is now able to offer three grades of glaze for laser systems. The samarium glaze absorbs radiation at the Nd-YAG lasing wavelength of 1064nm, and its further transitions near 940nm, 1120nm, 1320nm and 1440nm. A significant amount of fluorescent radiation at the lasing wavelength escapes laterally from the laser rod into the surrounding pumping cavity. Absorbing this radiation prevents it from being reflected back into the laser rod, which would in turn stimulate decay from the upper laser transition level, thereby limiting the number of excited ions which can occupy that level.

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sCMOS Cameras

With the addition of two new models, PCO (Kelheim, Germany) now provides eight sCMOS-cameras. The new pco.edge 3.1 and pco.edge 4.2LT are now the company’s entry-level cameras. pco.edge 3.1’s features include: 2048 x 1536 pixels resolution; 50 frames per second; 1.1e- med readout noise; 27000 : 1 dynamic range; >60% quantum efficiency; global and rolling shutter readout; and small form factor. pco.edge 4.2LT’s features include: 2048 x 2048 pixels resolution; 40 frames per second; 0.8e- med readout noise; 36000 : 1 dynamic range; >70% quantum efficiency; and a small form factor.

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Deep UV Luminescence Spectrophotometer

McPherson (Chelmsford, MA) has announced a new vacuum ultraviolet universal spectrophotometer, an optical test system optimized for emitting samples like phosphors or photo- and electro-luminescent crystals. It can measure reflectance, transmission and fluorescence emission over its complete working range, 120 nanometers to 2.2 microns. The sample chamber includes high efficiency toroidal optics for focused excitation and sensitive detection. It can operate purged or under vacuum and can interface to commercial cryogenic and heated sample mounts.

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Laser Radiation Detector Screens

The path of invisible laser radiation can be verified using detector cards from Laser Components (Hudson, NH). These cards are ready for immediate application and do not have to be activated or optically charged. The cards for wavelengths from 1.5m to 5m and 5m to 20m can localize the beam path of Hol:YAG, Er:YAG, and CO2 lasers, for example.

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